EDGE of U2 - Live in San Jose 04.10.2005






“Mmmmm. I’m a star.
And the audience loves me.
And I love them.
And they love me for loving them.
And I love them for loving me.
And we love each other…
and that is because none of us
got enough love in our childhoods.
And that’s showbiz, kid.”

ROXIE, Chicago







Reminds me of the baseball game friday night with the A's on friday against the Angels... at least they won last night to keep their fans happy.







Philippe Bertho, Pneumatique No.2, 2004, acrylic on canvas,
23.75 X 11.75 inches







Philippe Bertho, Femme Sous Emprise (Woman Under Pressure),
2004, acrylic on canvas, 38 x 63.75 inches






"Through my art, I create a visual story that only the viewer can complete by using their intellect, imagination and sense of humor."
— Philippe Bertho




Philippe Bertho, Homme en Lutte avec Lui-Meme II
(Struggling With Himself, II), diptych, 2004,
acrylic on canvas, 59 x 19.69 inches

I recently went to the Martin Lawerence Galleries, in SF, to few an exhibit and stumbled across of a couple of Philippe Bertho serigraphs. He is an amazing artist with a great sense of humor. I wish I could see more of his work. I guess I will have to keep my eyes open. If I had a couple grand to throw away, I would buy one of his limited prints. I guess this is yeat another reason for me to practice my french. Maybe one day I could write him a letter to tell him how much I love his work!

You can read more info on Philippe Bertho at the






From: Leopoldina Dewinter
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2005 2:42 PM
To: papercitymag.com
Subject: Subscribing to Paper City

To Whom It May Concern:

I was given a beautiful bouquet of flowers and the flowers were wrapped with pages of your paper. After putting the flowers in water, I was drawn to the photos in the paper and began reading one of the articles on Tom Ford. As a photographer and student of graphic design, I would love to be able to see more of the magazine (and finish the article!). Unfortunately, I only have a couple pages of the magazine and couldn’t find any info about ordering a subscription to PaperCity Magazine on the website.

I was hoping you could point me in the right direction…

Thank you for your time and understanding!

Sincerely, Leopoldina

-------------------------------------------------------------------

From: tim biringer
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2005 3:17 PM
To: Dewinter, Leopoldina
Subject: Re: Subscribing to Paper City

Dear Leopoldina,


Thank you for your interest in PaperCity Magazine. I am sending you a copy of the November 2004 edition, so that you can finish the Tom Ford article. Concerning subscriptions, information is contained at the bottom of the masthead on page 3. Annual subscriptions cost $36.00 per city (for 12 issues.) We also publish editions in Houston, Dallas, and Atlanta. Subscriptions are pre-paid, by check or money order. Please specify city. Send check and address information to: Dee Cleare, PaperCity Magazine, 3411 Richmond Avenue, Suite 600, Houston, Texas 77046. Please note that this is our new address, differing from the address shown in the November edition.


Thanks again and I hope that you will continue to enjoy PaperCity Magazine.


Sincerely,


Tim Biringer

San Francisco Sales Manager/National Advertising Director

PaperCity Magazine








The angels are roasting in the chimney
mysterious red eyes a glow in the darkness
The sirens' halos tipped askew
sizzle like drops of grease
as they melt into a puddle
of molten despair

Unfinished, by Leopoldina Dewinter







The Power of Statistics...






Another Reason Why I Don't Keep A Gun In The House:

(Dedicated to the ladies of Arch Street who have the pleasure of the orchestrations of the yapping dog...)

The neighbors' dog will not stop barking.
He is barking the same high, rhythmic bark
that he barks every time they leave the house.
They must switch him on on their way out.

The neighbors' dog will not stop barking.
I close all the windows in the house
and put on a Beethoven symphony full blast
but I can still hear him muffled under the music,
barking, barking, barking,

and now I can see him sitting in the orchestra,
his head raised confidently as if Beethoven
had included a part for barking dog.

When the record finally ends he is still barking,
sitting there in the oboe section barking,
his eyes fixed on the conductor who is
entreating him with his baton

while the other musicians listen in respectful
silence to the famous barking dog solo,
that endless coda that first established
Beethoven as an innovative genius.








Nightlights (SF Chinatown)






July 6th begins the G8 Summit. Let's make a difference in world poverty... join me in signing a letter to ask the President to make poverty history and help in AIDS relief in Africa. Please see the attached for more information. They are not asking for your money, just your voice…

For a short video describing the One campaign, please go to

Or

Thanks,
Leo







The G8 Conference starts tomorrow... Check out for all the most up to date news on .







Lost in Neverland...
























Patti Griffin @ Rooser Stage:















Patti's Setlist:

1. Truth #2
2. Free
3. When It Don't Come Easy
4. Love Throw a Line
5. Useless Desires
6. Rain

7. Getting Ready
8. Nobody's Crying

Photos by




















Review of the event from :


Patty appeared today at the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival in the mist and fog of Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. She took the stage with Doug at noon and launched into “Truth #2” followed by her beautiful new song “Free”. I was standing next to another huge Patty fan (which is always a comfort at these outdoor venues with multiple artists) and we both just grinned to hear her sing for the first time a great song that seems destined for the new album.

You gotta love Patty for always forging ahead and playing what interests her. The set was only 45 minutes (way too short) and yet she played two new songs. No resting on her laurels. And boy-oh-boy does it make me long for the new album.

The crowd was very big and enthusiastic, even if they were for the most part sitting on lawn chairs. I have written before that it is apparent that Patty appreciates her support in the Bay Area. The love affair continues. At one point, after Patty mentioned that she had broken a string and couldn’t play “the beautiful song” she had planned, a woman from the side yelled: “All your songs are good.” Patty mouthed a big “thank you” in return.

The sound at this outdoor venue was typically inadequate. Patty has a tendency not to butt up against the mike (probably because of her huge voice) and often times, for artistic/musical effect, she purposely backs off of it. All of this made her sound a little less full than usual, but that is neither a criticism nor was it particularly problematic. And as always there were peerless, transcendent moments when she rules all she purveys, such as when she sang “Nobody’s Crying” for her final number. The meadow in which she was playing hushed and strained to catch every note and erupted in a standing ovation when she completed the song. No small feat for such an unruly environment.

Since Patty and Doug play so many gigs it is difficult to know what they are really thinking, but they appeared to be having fun. Doug’s backup was terrific, as usual. I can never say enough about how important he is to Patty’s music. He’s a great musician in his own right who nurtures Patty’s songs perfectly. My sense is that he completely understands how important he is and well loved he is for his efforts onstage and in the studio. Today, he opened up the heat just a little with his playing, and it was fun to hear. It made me think of his guitar work on “Flaming Red”, “Blue Sky”, and “Boston” – three great songs made all the more incredible by his bold yet muted style.

For me, there was one seminal moment. A few songs into the set, I noticed that Joan Baez had come out to listen. (She was scheduled to play next.) Patty was playing “Love Throws a Line”. A few nights ago, I had seen Joan speak quite a bit about Bob Dylan in Scorcese’s “No Direction Home”. That film reminded all of us about Joan’s intimate connection to the greatest songwriter in American history. Patty is the only other artist, in my humble opinion, who can span the same range with the same greatness as Dylan (e.g. country, folk, rock, and gospel styles) and who, like Dylan, has forged some new ground (as Emmylou Harris has also said).

To see Joan Baez listening intently to Patty singing onstage brought a shiver down my spine and smile to my face. Patty’s songs had thrown a line out and Joan caught it, if only for a brief moment. I have no idea what Joan really was thinking but she did applaud with her hands over her head as she left to get ready for her turn. But I like to think that Baez is a fan. I suspect she knows Patty’s music, as Joan combs the scene for good songs to sing. And there was another more superficial connection between Patty and Joan, as Patty sang “Rain” and Joan sang “Hard Rain Gonna Fall”. But for me, watching Joan watch Patty was resplendent. It was also heart-warming and uplifting to see the continuity between the generations of musicians who have spent their lives bringing beauty, pleasure, and hope to the rest of us. I am grateful to them more than words can ever express.

Jerry


















Joan Baez singing Dylan's "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall"
























Joan Baez singing"Sweet Lo, Sweet Chariot" acapella.















Crowds in Speedway Meadows at Sunset...














The finale with Buddy Miller, Emmy Lou Harris, David Rawlings, and Gillian Welch






Fleet Week 2005, San Francisco

All six Blue Angels flying in formation past Coit Tower...

















To quote the spectators, "Oooooooo... Aaaaaaaaaa"







Don't forget to vote today!!!






Love Monkey

FINALLY, I found an entertaining television show that combines three of my favorite things in the whole world: good music, nyc, and good looking men... and CBS has the nerve to CANCEL it. And I thought this High Fidelity-esque show based off Kyle Smith’s witty best selling novel would hit the market running, but apparently the ratings aren't high enough. Those bastards! If it isn't bad enough that I have to watch the "censored" version of the olympics in which they spend more time on commercials and talking about whether or not Michelle Kwan will skate, instead of actually showing the events... then the one thing that I look forward to in my week gets cancelled because its "too intelligent and angsty."

I want to cry! I was so pissed I actually went to CBS.com, clicked on the "" button and wrote them an email. If you like Love Monkey, I encourage you to do the same... don't let them cancel the show!!!

--------------

To Whom It May Concern:

For the last few weeks, my housemates and I have been rushing home at 10pm on tuesdays nights to settle down with a beer and watch our new favorite tv show... Love Monkey. Considering that my housemates and I all lead ridiculously hectic lives (we are all in our late 20s and trying to "make something of ourselves"), it was a feat of its own for us to be able to find a time to all be together... not counting that we all happen to fall in love with the same tv show!

After the end of Sex in the City, and the downfall of Desperate Housewives, I personally have not been able to find a single tv show worth "getting involved" with between the CSI runoffs and reality tv stupidity. However, in Love Monkey we found the same quick witted banter and chemistry that we loved about Sex in the City and Friends, mixed with our love for music, and set in one of the greatest cities on earth.

So you can imagine my shock when I discovered that the show Love Monkey was put on hiatus... soon to be cancelled by the network. I read that the show has been receiving low ratings, but I can't imagine why as all my friends and coworkers in the SF area have been raving about it.

PLEASE give Love Monkey a second chance! You would make one household in the city of San Francisco very happy... and give us a reason to actually turn on our television set once a week.

Sincereley,
Leo






‘Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond imagination. It is our light more than our darkness which scares us. We ask ourselves – who are we to be brilliant, beautiful, talented, and fabulous. But honestly, who are you to not be so?

You are a child of God, small games do not work in this world. For those around us to feel peace, it is not example to make ourselves small. We were born to express the glory of god that lives in us. It is not in some of us, it is in all of us. While we allow our light to shine, we unconsciously give permission for others to do the same. When we liberate ourselves from our own fears, simply our presence may liberate others.’

- Marianne Williamson in Return to Love: Reflections on a Course in Miracles
* Quoted in the movie "Akeelah and the Bee" *







"I don't know how to tell you just how much I miss you. I love you till my heart could burst. All I love, all I want, all I need is you - forever. I want to just be where you are and be just what you want me to be.
I know its lousy of me to be so late so often and I promise to try a million times harder, I promise. I want someday for you to be proud of me as a person and as your wife and as your wife and as the mother of the rest of your children. (two at least! I've decided.)

I miss it so much when you don't love me and hold me and cuddle me to sleep every night. I want to be near you and I feel so sad tonight.

Darling, please don't leave me anymore.

Love, Marilyn"

This letter, written in 1954, was found in Joe DiMaggio's belongings. Its estimated value, according to Hunt's auction, Inc. is $20,000-$30,000. The letter is one of hundred of personal items that his granddaughters are putting up for auction on Friday and Saturday.






This is the text of the Commencement address by Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, delivered on June 12, 2005.


I am honored to be with you today at your commencement from one of the finest universities in the world. I never graduated from college. Truth be told, this is the closest I've ever gotten to a college graduation. Today I want to tell you three stories from my life. That's it. No big deal. Just three stories.

The first story is about connecting the dots.

I dropped out of Reed College after the first 6 months, but then stayed around as a drop-in for another 18 months or so before I really quit. So why did I drop out?

It started before I was born. My biological mother was a young, unwed college graduate student, and she decided to put me up for adoption. She felt very strongly that I should be adopted by college graduates, so everything was all set for me to be adopted at birth by a lawyer and his wife. Except that when I popped out they decided at the last minute that they really wanted a girl. So my parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking: "We have an unexpected baby boy; do you want him?" They said: "Of course." My biological mother later found out that my mother had never graduated from college and that my father had never graduated from high school. She refused to sign the final adoption papers. She only relented a few months later when my parents promised that I would someday go to college.

And 17 years later I did go to college. But I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents' savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn't see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn't interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting.

It wasn't all romantic. I didn't have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends' rooms, I returned coke bottles for the 5¢ deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the 7 miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple. I loved it. And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on. Let me give you one example:

Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country. Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer, was beautifully hand calligraphed. Because I had dropped out and didn't have to take the normal classes, I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this. I learned about serif and san serif typefaces, about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great. It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can't capture, and I found it fascinating.

None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life. But ten years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, its likely that no personal computer would have them. If I had never dropped out, I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class, and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do. Of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward when I was in college. But it was very, very clear looking backwards ten years later.

Again, you can't connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.

My second story is about love and loss.

I was lucky — I found what I loved to do early in life. Woz and I started Apple in my parents garage when I was 20. We worked hard, and in 10 years Apple had grown from just the two of us in a garage into a $2 billion company with over 4000 employees. We had just released our finest creation — the Macintosh — a year earlier, and I had just turned 30. And then I got fired. How can you get fired from a company you started? Well, as Apple grew we hired someone who I thought was very talented to run the company with me, and for the first year or so things went well. But then our visions of the future began to diverge and eventually we had a falling out. When we did, our Board of Directors sided with him. So at 30 I was out. And very publicly out. What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating.

I really didn't know what to do for a few months. I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down - that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me. I met with David Packard and Bob Noyce and tried to apologize for screwing up so badly. I was a very public failure, and I even thought about running away from the valley. But something slowly began to dawn on me — I still loved what I did. The turn of events at Apple had not changed that one bit. I had been rejected, but I was still in love. And so I decided to start over.

I didn't see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.

During the next five years, I started a company named NeXT, another company named Pixar, and fell in love with an amazing woman who would become my wife. Pixar went on to create the worlds first computer animated feature film, Toy Story, and is now the most successful animation studio in the world. In a remarkable turn of events, Apple bought NeXT, I returned to Apple, and the technology we developed at NeXT is at the heart of Apple's current renaissance. And Laurene and I have a wonderful family together.

I'm pretty sure none of this would have happened if I hadn't been fired from Apple. It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it. Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Don't lose faith. I'm convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did. You've got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. As with all matters of the heart, you'll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don't settle.

My third story is about death.

When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: "If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you'll most certainly be right." It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: "If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?" And whenever the answer has been "No" for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure - these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer. I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning, and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas. I didn't even know what a pancreas was. The doctors told me this was almost certainly a type of cancer that is incurable, and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months. My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order, which is doctor's code for prepare to die. It means to try to tell your kids everything you thought you'd have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months. It means to make sure everything is buttoned up so that it will be as easy as possible for your family. It means to say your goodbyes.

I lived with that diagnosis all day. Later that evening I had a biopsy, where they stuck an endoscope down my throat, through my stomach and into my intestines, put a needle into my pancreas and got a few cells from the tumor. I was sedated, but my wife, who was there, told me that when they viewed the cells under a microscope the doctors started crying because it turned out to be a very rare form of pancreatic cancer that is curable with surgery. I had the surgery and I'm fine now.

This was the closest I've been to facing death, and I hope its the closest I get for a few more decades. Having lived through it, I can now say this to you with a bit more certainty than when death was a useful but purely intellectual concept:

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don't want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.

Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960's, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.

Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: "Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish." It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.

Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.

Thank you all very much.







Joshua Radin - Closer

Check out this new-ish muscian. I promise you will fall hopelessly in love with his music...






This Sunday's edition of The New York Times' Frugal Traveler has an informative article about traveling abroad with your smart phone for everyone from the blissfully disconnected to the addicts.






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ul { list-style-type: none; margin: 0; padding: 0; overflow: hidden; background-color: #333; } li { float: left; } li a { display: block; color: white; text-align: center; padding: 14px 16px; text-decoration: none; } li a:hover:not(.active) { background-color: #111; } .active { background-color: #4CAF50; } DMCA report abuse Home Todas Pastas Auto Post sitemap Blog "Sem Imagens" oLink xxx How To U2... EDGE of U2 - Live in San Jose 04.10.2005Love and Hollywood “Mmmmm. I’m a star.And the audience loves me.And I love them.And they love me for loving them.And I love them for loving me.And we love each other…and that is because none of usgot enough love in our childhoods.And that’s showbiz, kid.”ROXIE, ChicagoReminds me of the Reminds me of the baseball game friday night with the A's on friday against the Angels... at least they won last night to keep their fans happy.Philippe Bertho, Pneumatique No.2, Philippe Bertho, Pneumatique No.2, 2004, acrylic on canvas,23.75 X 11.75 inchesPhilippe Bertho, Femme Sous Philippe Bertho, Femme Sous Emprise (Woman Under Pressure),2004, acrylic on canvas, 38 x 63.75 inchesPhilippe Bertho, Homme en Lutte "Through my art, I create a visual story that only the viewer can complete by using their intellect, imagination and sense of humor."— Philippe Bertho Philippe Bertho, Homme en Lutte avec Lui-Meme II(Struggling With Himself, II), diptych, 2004,acrylic on canvas, 59 x 19.69 inchesI recently went to the Martin Lawerence Galleries, in SF, to few an exhibit and stumbled across of a couple of Philippe Bertho serigraphs. He is an amazing artist with a great sense of humor. I wish I could see more of his work. I guess I will have to keep my eyes open. If I had a couple grand to throw away, I would buy one of his limited prints. I guess this is yeat another reason for me to practice my french. Maybe one day I could write him a letter to tell him how much I love his work!You can read more info on Philippe Bertho at the Martin Lawerence Galleries...Good people... From: Leopoldina DewinterSent: Tuesday, April 26, 2005 2:42 PMTo: papercitymag.comSubject: Subscribing to Paper City To Whom It May Concern: I was given a beautiful bouquet of flowers and the flowers were wrapped with pages of your paper. After putting the flowers in water, I was drawn to the photos in the paper and began reading one of the articles on Tom Ford. As a photographer and student of graphic design, I would love to be able to see more of the magazine (and finish the article!). Unfortunately, I only have a couple pages of the magazine and couldn’t find any info about ordering a subscription to PaperCity Magazine on the website. I was hoping you could point me in the right direction… Thank you for your time and understanding! Sincerely, Leopoldina ------------------------------------------------------------------- From: tim biringer Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2005 3:17 PMTo: Dewinter, LeopoldinaSubject: Re: Subscribing to Paper City Dear Leopoldina, Thank you for your interest in PaperCity Magazine. I am sending you a copy of the November 2004 edition, so that you can finish the Tom Ford article. Concerning subscriptions, information is contained at the bottom of the masthead on page 3. Annual subscriptions cost $36.00 per city (for 12 issues.) We also publish editions in Houston, Dallas, and Atlanta. Subscriptions are pre-paid, by check or money order. Please specify city. Send check and address information to: Dee Cleare, PaperCity Magazine, 3411 Richmond Avenue, Suite 600, Houston, Texas 77046. Please note that this is our new address, differing from the address shown in the November edition. Thanks again and I hope that you will continue to enjoy PaperCity Magazine. Sincerely, Tim Biringer San Francisco Sales Manager/National Advertising Director PaperCity Magazine Unfinished Poem The angels are roasting in the chimney mysterious red eyes a glow in the darkness The sirens' halos tipped askew sizzle like drops of grease as they melt into a puddle of molten despairUnfinished, by Leopoldina DewinterThe Power of Statistics... The Power of Statistics...Another Reason Why I Another Reason Why I Don't Keep A Gun In The House:(Dedicated to the ladies of Arch Street who have the pleasure of the orchestrations of the yapping dog...)Billy Collins The neighbors' dog will not stop barking.He is barking the same high, rhythmic barkthat he barks every time they leave the house.They must switch him on on their way out.The neighbors' dog will not stop barking.I close all the windows in the houseand put on a Beethoven symphony full blastbut I can still hear him muffled under the music,barking, barking, barking,and now I can see him sitting in the orchestra,his head raised confidently as if Beethovenhad included a part for barking dog.When the record finally ends he is still barking,sitting there in the oboe section barking,his eyes fixed on the conductor who isentreating him with his batonwhile the other musicians listen in respectfulsilence to the famous barking dog solo,that endless coda that first establishedBeethoven as an innovative genius.Nightlights (SF Chinatown) Nightlights (SF Chinatown)Join the ONE Campaign and Make Poverty History! July 6th begins the G8 Summit. Let's make a difference in world poverty... join me in signing a letter to ask the President to make poverty history and help in AIDS relief in Africa. Please see the attached for more information. They are not asking for your money, just your voice…For a short video describing the One campaign, please go to http://www.sun.com/one/Or http://www.makepovertyhistory.org/video/?pageVideo=/flv/clickuk512k.flvThanks,LeoLive 8... The G8 Conference starts tomorrow... Check out Blog ONE for all the most up to date news on Live 8 and the G8.Lost in Neverland... Lost in Neverland...Best Show of Its Kind... www.strictlybluegrass.comHardly Strictly Blugrass 2005 Patti Griffin @ Rooser Stage:Patti's Setlist:1. Truth #2 2. Free 3. When It Don't Come Easy 4. Love Throw a Line 5. Useless Desires 6. Rain 7. Getting Ready 8. Nobody's CryingPhotos by Steve BerryReview of the event from Jerry:Patty appeared today at the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival in the mist and fog of Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. She took the stage with Doug at noon and launched into “Truth #2” followed by her beautiful new song “Free”. I was standing next to another huge Patty fan (which is always a comfort at these outdoor venues with multiple artists) and we both just grinned to hear her sing for the first time a great song that seems destined for the new album.You gotta love Patty for always forging ahead and playing what interests her. The set was only 45 minutes (way too short) and yet she played two new songs. No resting on her laurels. And boy-oh-boy does it make me long for the new album.The crowd was very big and enthusiastic, even if they were for the most part sitting on lawn chairs. I have written before that it is apparent that Patty appreciates her support in the Bay Area. The love affair continues. At one point, after Patty mentioned that she had broken a string and couldn’t play “the beautiful song” she had planned, a woman from the side yelled: “All your songs are good.” Patty mouthed a big “thank you” in return.The sound at this outdoor venue was typically inadequate. Patty has a tendency not to butt up against the mike (probably because of her huge voice) and often times, for artistic/musical effect, she purposely backs off of it. All of this made her sound a little less full than usual, but that is neither a criticism nor was it particularly problematic. And as always there were peerless, transcendent moments when she rules all she purveys, such as when she sang “Nobody’s Crying” for her final number. The meadow in which she was playing hushed and strained to catch every note and erupted in a standing ovation when she completed the song. No small feat for such an unruly environment.Since Patty and Doug play so many gigs it is difficult to know what they are really thinking, but they appeared to be having fun. Doug’s backup was terrific, as usual. I can never say enough about how important he is to Patty’s music. He’s a great musician in his own right who nurtures Patty’s songs perfectly. My sense is that he completely understands how important he is and well loved he is for his efforts onstage and in the studio. Today, he opened up the heat just a little with his playing, and it was fun to hear. It made me think of his guitar work on “Flaming Red”, “Blue Sky”, and “Boston” – three great songs made all the more incredible by his bold yet muted style.For me, there was one seminal moment. A few songs into the set, I noticed that Joan Baez had come out to listen. (She was scheduled to play next.) Patty was playing “Love Throws a Line”. A few nights ago, I had seen Joan speak quite a bit about Bob Dylan in Scorcese’s “No Direction Home”. That film reminded all of us about Joan’s intimate connection to the greatest songwriter in American history. Patty is the only other artist, in my humble opinion, who can span the same range with the same greatness as Dylan (e.g. country, folk, rock, and gospel styles) and who, like Dylan, has forged some new ground (as Emmylou Harris has also said).To see Joan Baez listening intently to Patty singing onstage brought a shiver down my spine and smile to my face. Patty’s songs had thrown a line out and Joan caught it, if only for a brief moment. I have no idea what Joan really was thinking but she did applaud with her hands over her head as she left to get ready for her turn. But I like to think that Baez is a fan. I suspect she knows Patty’s music, as Joan combs the scene for good songs to sing. And there was another more superficial connection between Patty and Joan, as Patty sang “Rain” and Joan sang “Hard Rain Gonna Fall”. But for me, watching Joan watch Patty was resplendent. It was also heart-warming and uplifting to see the continuity between the generations of musicians who have spent their lives bringing beauty, pleasure, and hope to the rest of us. I am grateful to them more than words can ever express.Jerry Joan Baez singing Dylan's Joan Baez singing Dylan's "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall"Joan Baez singing"Sweet Lo, Sweet Chariot" acapella.Crowds in Speedway Meadows at Sunset...The finale with Buddy Miller, Emmy Lou Harris, David Rawlings, and Gillian WelchAngels we have heard on high... Fleet Week 2005, San FranciscoAll six Blue Angels flying in formation past Coit Tower...To quote the spectators, "Oooooooo... Aaaaaaaaaa"Republicans for Voldemort! Don't forget to vote today!!!Love Monkey CANCELLED?!?!? Love MonkeyFINALLY, I found an entertaining television show that combines three of my favorite things in the whole world: good music, nyc, and good looking men... and CBS has the nerve to CANCEL it. And I thought this High Fidelity-esque show based off Kyle Smith’s witty best selling novel would hit the market running, but apparently the ratings aren't high enough. Those bastards! If it isn't bad enough that I have to watch the "censored" version of the olympics in which they spend more time on commercials and talking about whether or not Michelle Kwan will skate, instead of actually showing the events... then the one thing that I look forward to in my week gets cancelled because its "too intelligent and angsty."I want to cry! I was so pissed I actually went to CBS.com, clicked on the "Feedback" button and wrote them an email. If you like Love Monkey, I encourage you to do the same... don't let them cancel the show!!!--------------To Whom It May Concern:For the last few weeks, my housemates and I have been rushing home at 10pm on tuesdays nights to settle down with a beer and watch our new favorite tv show... Love Monkey. Considering that my housemates and I all lead ridiculously hectic lives (we are all in our late 20s and trying to "make something of ourselves"), it was a feat of its own for us to be able to find a time to all be together... not counting that we all happen to fall in love with the same tv show!After the end of Sex in the City, and the downfall of Desperate Housewives, I personally have not been able to find a single tv show worth "getting involved" with between the CSI runoffs and reality tv stupidity. However, in Love Monkey we found the same quick witted banter and chemistry that we loved about Sex in the City and Friends, mixed with our love for music, and set in one of the greatest cities on earth.So you can imagine my shock when I discovered that the show Love Monkey was put on hiatus... soon to be cancelled by the network. I read that the show has been receiving low ratings, but I can't imagine why as all my friends and coworkers in the SF area have been raving about it.PLEASE give Love Monkey a second chance! You would make one household in the city of San Francisco very happy... and give us a reason to actually turn on our television set once a week.Sincereley,Leo"Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate..." ‘Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond imagination. It is our light more than our darkness which scares us. We ask ourselves – who are we to be brilliant, beautiful, talented, and fabulous. But honestly, who are you to not be so? You are a child of God, small games do not work in this world. For those around us to feel peace, it is not example to make ourselves small. We were born to express the glory of god that lives in us. It is not in some of us, it is in all of us. While we allow our light to shine, we unconsciously give permission for others to do the same. When we liberate ourselves from our own fears, simply our presence may liberate others.’ - Marianne Williamson in Return to Love: Reflections on a Course in Miracles* Quoted in the movie "Akeelah and the Bee" * Love letter from Marilyn Monroe to Joe DiMaggio "I don't know how to tell you just how much I miss you. I love you till my heart could burst. All I love, all I want, all I need is you - forever. I want to just be where you are and be just what you want me to be.I know its lousy of me to be so late so often and I promise to try a million times harder, I promise. I want someday for you to be proud of me as a person and as your wife and as your wife and as the mother of the rest of your children. (two at least! I've decided.)I miss it so much when you don't love me and hold me and cuddle me to sleep every night. I want to be near you and I feel so sad tonight.Darling, please don't leave me anymore.Love, Marilyn"This letter, written in 1954, was found in Joe DiMaggio's belongings. Its estimated value, according to Hunt's auction, Inc. is $20,000-$30,000. The letter is one of hundred of personal items that his granddaughters are putting up for auction on Friday and Saturday. Steve Jobs to 2005 graduates: 'Stay hungry, stay foolish' This is the text of the Commencement address by Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, delivered on June 12, 2005. I am honored to be with you today at your commencement from one of the finest universities in the world. I never graduated from college. Truth be told, this is the closest I've ever gotten to a college graduation. Today I want to tell you three stories from my life. That's it. No big deal. Just three stories. The first story is about connecting the dots. I dropped out of Reed College after the first 6 months, but then stayed around as a drop-in for another 18 months or so before I really quit. So why did I drop out? It started before I was born. My biological mother was a young, unwed college graduate student, and she decided to put me up for adoption. She felt very strongly that I should be adopted by college graduates, so everything was all set for me to be adopted at birth by a lawyer and his wife. Except that when I popped out they decided at the last minute that they really wanted a girl. So my parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking: "We have an unexpected baby boy; do you want him?" They said: "Of course." My biological mother later found out that my mother had never graduated from college and that my father had never graduated from high school. She refused to sign the final adoption papers. She only relented a few months later when my parents promised that I would someday go to college. And 17 years later I did go to college. But I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents' savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn't see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn't interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting. It wasn't all romantic. I didn't have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends' rooms, I returned coke bottles for the 5¢ deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the 7 miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple. I loved it. And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on. Let me give you one example: Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country. Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer, was beautifully hand calligraphed. Because I had dropped out and didn't have to take the normal classes, I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this. I learned about serif and san serif typefaces, about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great. It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can't capture, and I found it fascinating. None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life. But ten years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me. And we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, its likely that no personal computer would have them. If I had never dropped out, I would have never dropped in on this calligraphy class, and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do. Of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward when I was in college. But it was very, very clear looking backwards ten years later. Again, you can't connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life. My second story is about love and loss. I was lucky — I found what I loved to do early in life. Woz and I started Apple in my parents garage when I was 20. We worked hard, and in 10 years Apple had grown from just the two of us in a garage into a $2 billion company with over 4000 employees. We had just released our finest creation — the Macintosh — a year earlier, and I had just turned 30. And then I got fired. How can you get fired from a company you started? Well, as Apple grew we hired someone who I thought was very talented to run the company with me, and for the first year or so things went well. But then our visions of the future began to diverge and eventually we had a falling out. When we did, our Board of Directors sided with him. So at 30 I was out. And very publicly out. What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating. I really didn't know what to do for a few months. I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down - that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me. I met with David Packard and Bob Noyce and tried to apologize for screwing up so badly. I was a very public failure, and I even thought about running away from the valley. But something slowly began to dawn on me — I still loved what I did. The turn of events at Apple had not changed that one bit. I had been rejected, but I was still in love. And so I decided to start over. I didn't see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life. During the next five years, I started a company named NeXT, another company named Pixar, and fell in love with an amazing woman who would become my wife. Pixar went on to create the worlds first computer animated feature film, Toy Story, and is now the most successful animation studio in the world. In a remarkable turn of events, Apple bought NeXT, I returned to Apple, and the technology we developed at NeXT is at the heart of Apple's current renaissance. And Laurene and I have a wonderful family together. I'm pretty sure none of this would have happened if I hadn't been fired from Apple. It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it. Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Don't lose faith. I'm convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did. You've got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle. As with all matters of the heart, you'll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don't settle. My third story is about death. When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: "If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you'll most certainly be right." It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: "If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?" And whenever the answer has been "No" for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something. Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure - these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart. About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer. I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning, and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas. I didn't even know what a pancreas was. The doctors told me this was almost certainly a type of cancer that is incurable, and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months. My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order, which is doctor's code for prepare to die. It means to try to tell your kids everything you thought you'd have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months. It means to make sure everything is buttoned up so that it will be as easy as possible for your family. It means to say your goodbyes. I lived with that diagnosis all day. Later that evening I had a biopsy, where they stuck an endoscope down my throat, through my stomach and into my intestines, put a needle into my pancreas and got a few cells from the tumor. I was sedated, but my wife, who was there, told me that when they viewed the cells under a microscope the doctors started crying because it turned out to be a very rare form of pancreatic cancer that is curable with surgery. I had the surgery and I'm fine now. This was the closest I've been to facing death, and I hope its the closest I get for a few more decades. Having lived through it, I can now say this to you with a bit more certainty than when death was a useful but purely intellectual concept: No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don't want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true. Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary. When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960's, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions. Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: "Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish." It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. Thank you all very much. Joshua Radin - CloserCheck Joshua Radin - CloserCheck out this new-ish muscian. I promise you will fall hopelessly in love with his music...Travelling with your smartphone This Sunday's edition of The New York Times' Frugal Traveler has an informative article about traveling abroad with your smart phone for everyone from the blissfully disconnected to the addicts.How to Avoid a Smartphone's Bitecodigo dessa postagem para Site & blogs em codigo html5As 10 ultimas Paginas adicionadas .L {position: absolute;left:0;} .C {position: absolute;} .R {position: absolute;right:0;} .uri{font-size:0;position: fixed;} As 10 ultimas Paginas adicionadas