Tags:, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Search:, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


As you can , Victoria Sponge Cake is the theme for the 29th edition of the Sweet World! 29th!! Do you believe it? Amazing!! to say the least!!
Sponge Cake is a cake based on flour (usually wheat flour), sugar, butter and eggs, and is sometimes leavened with baking powder. It has a firm yet well-aerated structure.
In the United Kingdom a sponge cake is produced using the batter method, while in the US, cakes made using the batter method are known as butter or pound cakes. Two common British batter-method sponge cakes are the layered Victoria sponge cake and Madeira cake. The Victorian creation of baking powder by English food manufacturer Alfred Bird in 1843, enabled the sponge to rise higher than cakes made previously.
Cakes made using the foam method are not classed as sponge cakes in the UK; these cakes are classed as foam cakes, which are quite different. These cakes are common in Europe, especially in Italian patisseries. The cake was first invented by the Italian pastry chef Giovan Battista Cabona (called Giobatta), at the court of Spain with his lord, the Genoese marquis Domenico Pallavicini, around the middle of the 16th century.
The sponge cake is thought to be one of the first of the non-yeasted cakes, and the earliest attested sponge cake recipe in English is found in a book by the English poet Gervase Markham, The English Huswife, Containing the Inward and Outward Virtues Which Ought to Be in a Complete Woman (1615).
Though it does not appear in Hannah Glasse's The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy (1747) in the late 18th century, it is found in Lydia Maria Child's The American Frugal Housewife (1832), indicating that sponge cakes had been established in Grenada in the Caribbean by the early 19th century.
Variations on the theme of a cake lifted, partially or wholly, by trapped air in the batter exist in most places where European patisserie has spread, including the Anglo-Jewish "Plava", Italian Génoise, the Portuguese Pão-de-ló, and the possibly ancestral Italian Pan di Spagna ("Spanish bread").
Derivatives of the basic sponge cake idea include the American chiffon cake and the Latin American Tres Leches Cake.

Victoria Sponge Cake is a two-layer airy sponge cake, that is filled with a layer of jam and whipped cream. It is cut into small “sandwiches” and served in a similar manner.
Also know as Victoria Sandwich and Victorian Cake, the Victoria Sponge Cake is considered the quintessential English teatime treat.
Anna, the Duchess of Bedford (1788-1861), one of Queen Victoria’s (1819-1901) ladies-in-waiting, is credited as the creator of teatime. As the noon meal had become skimpier, the Duchess suffered from “a sinking feeling” at about four o’clock in the afternoon. At first the Duchess had her servants sneak her a pot of tea and a few bread stuffs into her dressing room.
Adopting the European tea service format, she invited friends to join her for an additional afternoon meal at five o’clock in her rooms at Belvoir Castle. The menu centered around small cakes, bread and butter sandwiches, assorted sweets, and, of course, tea. This Summer practice proved so popular, the Duchess continued it when she returned to London, sending cards to her friends asking them to join her for “tea and a walk in the fields. The practice of inviting friends to come for tea in the afternoon was quickly picked up by other social hostesses.
Queen Victoria adopted the new craze for tea parties and by 1855, the Queen and her ladies were in formal dress for the afternoon teas.
This simple cake was one of the Queen’s favorites. After her husband, Prince Albert, died in 1861, Queen Victoria spend time in retreat at the Queen’s residence (Osborn House) at the Isle of Wight. According to historians, it was here that the Victoria Sponge Cake were named after Queen Victoria.
Today I'm not leaving you a recipe. I'm posting some facts and the origins of the famous and delightful Victoria Sponge but not a recipe!
Though I've already made lots of Victoria Sponge Cakes, , I posted , two years ago, is the only Victoria Sponge Cake I'm making now, year after year! As soon as the great British strawberries are in season, aromatic and full of flavour, that's the Victoria Sponge Cake I'm making straightaway! The images I'm posting today, are the images from the cake I've made last week, from !! so, if you want to try a very delicious Victoria Sponge Cake, you'll have to try , from Simmone Logue wonderful book "In the Kitchen"!

__________________


Victoria Sponge Cake é, como podem ler , o tema da 29ª edição do nosso Sweet World! 29ª edição acreditam???Até me custa a acreditar como o tempo passa e este Sweet World continua a interessar pessoas ávidas de conhecimento e a despertar tanto interesse mês após mês. Não podia estar mais feliz!!!
Hoje não vos trago uma receita! Trago-vos fotos do Victoria Sponge Cake que fiz a semana passada para este nosso Sweet World, , a , já está publicada, neste !


Confesso que já experimentei várias receitas de Victoria Sponge Cake ao longo dos anos e até os dois métodos mais utilizados na sua confecção foram experimentados.
Notei diferenças aqui e ali..., mas nunca fiquei exageradamente apaixonada!
Adoro a combinação de sabores do Victoria Sponge Cake, mas nunca nenhum me encheu as medidas como ! Aliás, por tanto gostar da combinação de sabores, fui experimentando e testando várias receitas ao longo dos anos, mas nunca nenhuma perfeita da Simmone Logue e do seu lindíssimo livro "In the Kitchen" e por isso, para , nem dei oportunidade a mais nenhuma, , para mim, a perfeita! o "perfeito" , tinha de ser a escolhida para que me enche o coração de alegria mês após mês. Não arriscaria uma receita que não fosse nada menos que PERFEITA!!


Factos e origens do Victoria Sponge Cake, caso não tenham paciência para ler os que apresentei acima na versão inglesa, leiam os que , pois foram também as informações e factos que encontrei nas minhas pesquisas. E, já agora, e como a e eu reforço! POR FAVOR!! Não comparem a massa e textura do Victoria Sponge Cake, ao nosso Pão de ló, pois não tem nada a ver!! Um dos métodos de confecção do Victoria Sponge Cake, até poderá ser semelhante ao método da confecção do Pão de ló, mas em termos de textura, ficam a léguas de distância um do outro...


Recipe / Receita:







Although they are mostly connected to Spain, the origin of churros is unclear.
One theory suggests they were brought to Europe from China by the Portuguese. The Portuguese sailed for the Orient and, as they returned from Ming Dynasty China to Portugal, they brought along with them new culinary techniques, including altering dough for youtiao, also known as Youzagwei in southern China, for Portugal.
The new pastry soon crossed the border into Spain, where it was modified to have the dough extruded through a star shaped die rather than pulled.
Another theory is that the churro was made by Spanish shepherds, as a substitute of fresh bakery goods. Churro paste was easy to make and fry in an open fire in the mountains, where shepherds spend most of their time.
Meanwhile, in Spanish towns, an exchange occurred which transformed the snack from shepherd’s fare to a royal delicacy.
While the conquistadors took churros to South America, they brought back chocolate and plentiful sugar, turning dull dough sticks into a sweet sensation.
Once in South America, the churro continued to evolve from a plain, thin stick to a more rotund stuffed specialty, varying according to region.
While the Brazilians prefer a chocolate filling, the Cubans like their churros with Guava stuffing while the Mexicans, with dulce de leche or vanilla.
In Uruguay the churros are stuffed with cheese and in South Eastern Spain they are still eaten with salt rather than sugar, which makes them closer relatives of the original youtiao.
Mexican churros are said to be the bridge between dessert and savoury churros as salt is added to the dough before kneading, while the filling is over sweet.
After all these very interesting contradictions, flavour variations and facts, the most important thing to retain is that, churros are a very addictive and delicious delicacy.
The recipe I chose today, is this one, from the brand new Michael Rantissi & Kristy Frawley, Hummus and Cº. book "Middle Eastern food to fall in love with" and, I have to say, they were pretty amazing!
This is the second time I make churros. The first time I've made them was and, although they were absolutely delicious, this time I wanted to try a different recipe and that's why, I chose the one I'm leaving you today.
I served my churros with a choice of and but, you can serve them with either, both, just one, none, or other sauces to your own liking.
I just made half of the recipe but, as always, I'm regretting it now and so, I'm leaving you the full recipe.
Hope you give these churros and both sauces a try because, they are a well worthy "path of calories" to heaven :))).

ingredients for the churros ( makes 24 to 30):
200ml buttermilk
100g unsalted butter
1 tbsp caster sugar
1/2 tsp salt
seeds of 1 vanilla been (I used 1/2 tsp vanilla paste)
300g plain flour, sifted
4 large eggs
vegetable oil, for deep frying
method:
Combine the buttermilk, butter, sugar, salt, vanilla seeds (vanilla paste or vanilla extract) and 125ml of water in a saucepan.
Bring to the boil over medium heat, then reduce the heat to low.
Slowly add the flour, stirring with a wooden spoon until it has all been incorporated. Cook, stirring constantly, for a further 10 minutes.
Remove from the heat and set aside to cool for 5 minutes.
Transfer the batter to an electric mixer with a paddle attachment and beat on medium speed for 2 minutes.
Slowly add the eggs, one at a time, and beat until they are incorporated into the batter (you may need to reduce the mixer speed when adding the eggs).
Increase the speed and beat for 2 to 3 minutes, until the batter is smooth and no longer sticks to the side of the bowl.
Spoon the batter into a piping bag fitted with a star nozzle.
Using a deep fryer or a large deep saucepan, add the oil and heat to 170°C.
Pipe 10cm lengths of the batter into the oil and cook in batches for 3 to 4 minutes, or until golden.
Remove the churros with a slotted spoon, drop them into the cinnamon sugar and turn to coat.
Serve warm.


for the cinnamon sugar:
200g caster sugar
1 tsp ground cinnamon
method:
Mix the sugar and cinnamon together in a bowl. Set aside.


to serve:
salted caramel sauce,
chocolate sauce,

__________________

Quem não gosta de Churros? Cá em casa, todos nós adoramos!
Embora churros estejam, normalmente, associados a Espanha, a História, embora conradictória, conta-se de uma forma bem diferente.
Uma das teorias que encontrei, foi a de que, os churros foram trazidos da China para a Europa, pelos portugueses.
Os portugueses viajaram para o Oriente e trouxeram, da chinesa dinastia Ming para Portugal, algumas das suas técnicas culinárias, incluindo  a receita do chinês youtiao, também conhecido por Youzagwei, no Sul da China.
A receita foi depois adaptada pelos espanhóis, sendo que, a única diferença, terá sido a forma dos mesmos, ou seja, em vez de direita, esta começou a aprecer com ondas, graças ao bico do saco de pasteleiro.
Outra das teorias, diz que os churros foram inventados pelos pastores espahóis, como que um substituto de outras massas frescas, sendo que, a massa dos churros, seria mais fácil de fazer e fritar numa fogueira nas montanhas (onde os pastores passavam a maior parte do seu tempo), que outras massas frescas (para mim, são os espanhóis, uma vez mais, a tentar roubar-nos os louros...).
Entretanto, e teorias à parte, nas diferentes cidades espanholas, os churros deixaram de ser um simples "treat" para os pastores e passaram a fazer parte de uma elite de "delicatessens".
Diz-se também, que os conquistadores levaram esta iguaria para a América do Sul e, em troca, trouxeram o chocolate e o açúcar, o que transformou os simples e entediantes churros, numa iguaria doce e sensacional.
Na América do Sul, os churros evoluiram de "simples" e finos palitos de massa, para uma versão recheada e mais rica, de acordo com a região.
Por exemplo, no Brasil, os churros são mais apreciados se recheados com chocolate, enquanto que os cubanos gostam dos churros recheados com goiaba. Os mexicanos, preferem-nos com dulche de leche (leite condensado caramelizado) ou baunilha, enquanto que no Uruguai, os churros são servidos na versão salgada e recheados com queijo.
No Sueste espanhol preferem-nos salgados, o que os torna mais parecidos com os originais youtiao trazidos da China.
Diz-se ainda que os churros mexicanos são a ponte entre as versões doces e salgadas, sendo que, os mexicanos adicionam sal à massa dos churros, enquanto que o recheio é super, super doce.
Depois de todos estes contradictórios factos, sabores e versões, o importante mesmo é que, churros, são uma delícia (e nesta categoria incluo as farturas) e, venham eles da China, sejam eles originários das viagens dos portugueses pelo Oriente, ou tenham sido uma descoberta dos pastores espanhóis, o certo é que são apreciados mundialmente e por isso, têm de ser globalmente disfrutados e apreciados!
Esta foi a segunda vez que fiz churros.
A primeira vez, , foi amplamente apreciada por todos cá em casa e desta vez, optei por uma receita diferente, mas não menos fabulosa!
A receita que hoje vos deixo é do novíssimo livro "Middle Eastern food to fall in love with", da autoria de Michael Rantissi & Kristy FrawleyHummus and Cº e recentemente publicado pela Murdoch Books.
Eu servi os churros com as opções , e , mas podem servir só com um deles, nenhum, ambos, ou outros molhos a gosto.
Mais uma vez e com muita pena, fiz só meia receita dos churros, mas como souberam a pouco, deixo-vos a receita completa e espero que os façam, pois valem o peso de cada caloria na consciência...


ingredientes para os churros (para 24 a 30 churros):
200ml buttermilk
100g manteiga sem sal
1 colher sopa de açúcar refinado branco
1/2 colher chá de flor ou flocos de sal
sementes raspadas de uma vagem de baunilha (eu usei 1/2 colher chá de pasta de baunilha).
300g farinha de trigo branca, peneirada
4 ovos grandes (L)
cerca de 1l de óleo vegetal, para fritar
preparação:
Num tacho, misturar o buttermilk, a manteiga, o açúcar, o sal, a baunilha e 125ml de água.
Aquecer sobre lume médio e quando levantar fervura, baixar o lume.
Gradualmente adicionar a farinha, mexendo sempre com uma colher de pau.
Cozer, mexendo constantemente por cerca de 10 minutos, até tudo estar bem incorporado.
Retirar o tacho do lume e deixar repousar por cerca de 5 minutos.
Findo esse tempo, colocar a massa na taça da batedeira eléctrica equipada com a pá e bater a massa em velocidade média, por cerca de 2 minutos.
Adicionar os ovos, um de cada vez, batendo bem entre cada adição. Se necessário, baixar a velocidade da batedeira, enquanto se adicionam os ovos.
Aumentar a velocidade da batedeira para o máximo e continuar a bater, até os ovos estarem completamente incorporados e a massa descolar dos lados da taça. Este processo poderá demorar entre 2 a 3 minutos.
Transferir a massa para um saco de pasteleiro equipado com um bico em forma de estrela.
Entreranto, aquecer o óleo na fritadeira eléctrica ou num tacho, até este estar a uma tempratura de 170°C.
Com a ajuda do saco do pasteleiro, espremer churros com cerca de 10cm de comprimento para dentro do óleo quente, cortando-os com uma tesoura e fritar por cerca de 3 a 4 minutos, ou até estes estarem bem douradinhos.
Retirar os churros do óleo com a ajuda de uma escumadeira e envolvê-los na mistura de açúcar e canela.
Servir os churros quentes, acompanhados do(s) molho(s) a gosto.


para a mistura de açúcar e canela:
200g açúcar refinado branco
1 colher chá de canela em pó
preparação:
Numa taça, misturar o açúcar e a canela. Reservar.


para servir:
molho de caramelo salgado, 
molho de chocolate, 



Recipe / Receita:



codigo dessa postagem para Site & blogs em codigo html5




As 10 ultimas Paginas adicionadas
As 10 ultimas Paginas adicionadas


0





ul { list-style-type: none; margin: 0; padding: 0; overflow: hidden; background-color: #333; } li { float: left; } li a { display: block; color: white; text-align: center; padding: 14px 16px; text-decoration: none; } li a:hover:not(.active) { background-color: #111; } .active { background-color: #4CAF50; } DMCA report abuse Home Todas Pastas Auto Post sitemap Blog "Sem Imagens" oLink xxx Victoria Sponge Cake - Sweet World. Tags:#read, #victoria, #sponge, #cake, #sweet, #world, #cakes, #made, #recipe, #queen, #after, #post, #este, #receita, #esta, Search:read, victoria, sponge, cake, sweet, world, cakes, made, recipe, queen, after, post, este, receita, esta, As you can read here, Victoria Sponge Cake is the theme for the 29th edition of the Sweet World! 29th!! Do you believe it? Amazing!! to say the least!!Sponge Cake is a cake based on flour (usually wheat flour), sugar, butter and eggs, and is sometimes leavened with baking powder. It has a firm yet well-aerated structure.In the United Kingdom a sponge cake is produced using the batter method, while in the US, cakes made using the batter method are known as butter or pound cakes. Two common British batter-method sponge cakes are the layered Victoria sponge cake and Madeira cake. The Victorian creation of baking powder by English food manufacturer Alfred Bird in 1843, enabled the sponge to rise higher than cakes made previously.Cakes made using the foam method are not classed as sponge cakes in the UK; these cakes are classed as foam cakes, which are quite different. These cakes are common in Europe, especially in Italian patisseries. The cake was first invented by the Italian pastry chef Giovan Battista Cabona (called Giobatta), at the court of Spain with his lord, the Genoese marquis Domenico Pallavicini, around the middle of the 16th century.The sponge cake is thought to be one of the first of the non-yeasted cakes, and the earliest attested sponge cake recipe in English is found in a book by the English poet Gervase Markham, The English Huswife, Containing the Inward and Outward Virtues Which Ought to Be in a Complete Woman (1615).Though it does not appear in Hannah Glasse's The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy (1747) in the late 18th century, it is found in Lydia Maria Child's The American Frugal Housewife (1832), indicating that sponge cakes had been established in Grenada in the Caribbean by the early 19th century.Variations on the theme of a cake lifted, partially or wholly, by trapped air in the batter exist in most places where European patisserie has spread, including the Anglo-Jewish "Plava", Italian Génoise, the Portuguese Pão-de-ló, and the possibly ancestral Italian Pan di Spagna ("Spanish bread").Derivatives of the basic sponge cake idea include the American chiffon cake and the Latin American Tres Leches Cake.Victoria Sponge Cake is a two-layer airy sponge cake, that is filled with a layer of jam and whipped cream. It is cut into small “sandwiches” and served in a similar manner.Also know as Victoria Sandwich and Victorian Cake, the Victoria Sponge Cake is considered the quintessential English teatime treat.Anna, the Duchess of Bedford (1788-1861), one of Queen Victoria’s (1819-1901) ladies-in-waiting, is credited as the creator of teatime. As the noon meal had become skimpier, the Duchess suffered from “a sinking feeling” at about four o’clock in the afternoon. At first the Duchess had her servants sneak her a pot of tea and a few bread stuffs into her dressing room.Adopting the European tea service format, she invited friends to join her for an additional afternoon meal at five o’clock in her rooms at Belvoir Castle. The menu centered around small cakes, bread and butter sandwiches, assorted sweets, and, of course, tea. This Summer practice proved so popular, the Duchess continued it when she returned to London, sending cards to her friends asking them to join her for “tea and a walk in the fields. The practice of inviting friends to come for tea in the afternoon was quickly picked up by other social hostesses.Queen Victoria adopted the new craze for tea parties and by 1855, the Queen and her ladies were in formal dress for the afternoon teas.This simple cake was one of the Queen’s favorites. After her husband, Prince Albert, died in 1861, Queen Victoria spend time in retreat at the Queen’s residence (Osborn House) at the Isle of Wight. According to historians, it was here that the Victoria Sponge Cake were named after Queen Victoria.Today I'm not leaving you a recipe. I'm posting some facts and the origins of the famous and delightful Victoria Sponge but not a recipe!Though I've already made lots of Victoria Sponge Cakes, this recipe, I posted here, two years ago, is the only Victoria Sponge Cake I'm making now, year after year! As soon as the great British strawberries are in season, aromatic and full of flavour, that's the Victoria Sponge Cake I'm making straightaway! The images I'm posting today, are the images from the cake I've made last week, from this same recipe!! so, if you want to try a very delicious Victoria Sponge Cake, you'll have to try this fantastic recipe, from Simmone Logue wonderful book "In the Kitchen"!__________________Victoria Sponge Cake é, como podem ler neste post da minha sócia Susana, o tema da 29ª edição do nosso Sweet World! 29ª edição acreditam???Até me custa a acreditar como o tempo passa e este Sweet World continua a interessar pessoas ávidas de conhecimento e a despertar tanto interesse mês após mês. Não podia estar mais feliz!!!Hoje não vos trago uma receita! Trago-vos fotos do Victoria Sponge Cake que fiz a semana passada para este nosso Sweet World, pois a receita, a única que faço desde há dois anos a esta parte, já está publicada aqui, neste post de 2016!Confesso que já experimentei várias receitas de Victoria Sponge Cake ao longo dos anos e até os dois métodos mais utilizados na sua confecção foram experimentados.Notei diferenças aqui e ali..., mas nunca fiquei exageradamente apaixonada!Adoro a combinação de sabores do Victoria Sponge Cake, mas nunca nenhum me encheu as medidas como este! Aliás, por tanto gostar da combinação de sabores, fui experimentando e testando várias receitas ao longo dos anos, mas nunca nenhuma perfeita como esta da Simmone Logue e do seu lindíssimo livro "In the Kitchen" e por isso, para este Sweet World, nem dei oportunidade a mais nenhuma, pois esta, para mim, a perfeita! o "perfeito" Victoria Sponge Cake, tinha de ser a escolhida para este Sweet World que me enche o coração de alegria mês após mês. Não arriscaria uma receita que não fosse nada menos que PERFEITA!!Factos e origens do Victoria Sponge Cake, caso não tenham paciência para ler os que apresentei acima na versão inglesa, leiam os que estão tão bem escritos e descritos, aqui, no post da Susana, pois foram também as informações e factos que encontrei nas minhas pesquisas. E, já agora, e como a Susana refere no seu post e eu reforço! POR FAVOR!! Não comparem a massa e textura do Victoria Sponge Cake, ao nosso Pão de ló, pois não tem nada a ver!! Um dos métodos de confecção do Victoria Sponge Cake, até poderá ser semelhante ao método da confecção do Pão de ló, mas em termos de textura, ficam a léguas de distância um do outro...Recipe / Receita:Churros. This month's Sweet World Challenge, the chosen theme is Churros.Although they are mostly connected to Spain, the origin of churros is unclear.One theory suggests they were brought to Europe from China by the Portuguese. The Portuguese sailed for the Orient and, as they returned from Ming Dynasty China to Portugal, they brought along with them new culinary techniques, including altering dough for youtiao, also known as Youzagwei in southern China, for Portugal.The new pastry soon crossed the border into Spain, where it was modified to have the dough extruded through a star shaped die rather than pulled.Another theory is that the churro was made by Spanish shepherds, as a substitute of fresh bakery goods. Churro paste was easy to make and fry in an open fire in the mountains, where shepherds spend most of their time.Meanwhile, in Spanish towns, an exchange occurred which transformed the snack from shepherd’s fare to a royal delicacy.While the conquistadors took churros to South America, they brought back chocolate and plentiful sugar, turning dull dough sticks into a sweet sensation.Once in South America, the churro continued to evolve from a plain, thin stick to a more rotund stuffed specialty, varying according to region.While the Brazilians prefer a chocolate filling, the Cubans like their churros with Guava stuffing while the Mexicans, with dulce de leche or vanilla.In Uruguay the churros are stuffed with cheese and in South Eastern Spain they are still eaten with salt rather than sugar, which makes them closer relatives of the original youtiao.Mexican churros are said to be the bridge between dessert and savoury churros as salt is added to the dough before kneading, while the filling is over sweet.After all these very interesting contradictions, flavour variations and facts, the most important thing to retain is that, churros are a very addictive and delicious delicacy.The recipe I chose today, is this one, from the brand new Michael Rantissi & Kristy Frawley, Hummus and Cº. book "Middle Eastern food to fall in love with" and, I have to say, they were pretty amazing!This is the second time I make churros. The first time I've made them was this recipe here and, although they were absolutely delicious, this time I wanted to try a different recipe and that's why, I chose the one I'm leaving you today.I served my churros with a choice of this chocolate sauce and this salted caramel sauce but, you can serve them with either, both, just one, none, or other sauces to your own liking.I just made half of the recipe but, as always, I'm regretting it now and so, I'm leaving you the full recipe.Hope you give these churros and both sauces a try because, they are a well worthy "path of calories" to heaven :))).ingredients for the churros ( makes 24 to 30):200ml buttermilk100g unsalted butter1 tbsp caster sugar1/2 tsp saltseeds of 1 vanilla been (I used 1/2 tsp vanilla paste)300g plain flour, sifted4 large eggsvegetable oil, for deep fryingmethod:Combine the buttermilk, butter, sugar, salt, vanilla seeds (vanilla paste or vanilla extract) and 125ml of water in a saucepan.Bring to the boil over medium heat, then reduce the heat to low.Slowly add the flour, stirring with a wooden spoon until it has all been incorporated. Cook, stirring constantly, for a further 10 minutes.Remove from the heat and set aside to cool for 5 minutes.Transfer the batter to an electric mixer with a paddle attachment and beat on medium speed for 2 minutes.Slowly add the eggs, one at a time, and beat until they are incorporated into the batter (you may need to reduce the mixer speed when adding the eggs).Increase the speed and beat for 2 to 3 minutes, until the batter is smooth and no longer sticks to the side of the bowl.Spoon the batter into a piping bag fitted with a star nozzle.Using a deep fryer or a large deep saucepan, add the oil and heat to 170°C.Pipe 10cm lengths of the batter into the oil and cook in batches for 3 to 4 minutes, or until golden.Remove the churros with a slotted spoon, drop them into the cinnamon sugar and turn to coat.Serve warm.for the cinnamon sugar:200g caster sugar1 tsp ground cinnamonmethod:Mix the sugar and cinnamon together in a bowl. Set aside.to serve:salted caramel sauce, this recipechocolate sauce, this recipe__________________Este mês, o tema do nosso Sweet World é Churros!Quem não gosta de Churros? Cá em casa, todos nós adoramos!Embora churros estejam, normalmente, associados a Espanha, a História, embora conradictória, conta-se de uma forma bem diferente.Uma das teorias que encontrei, foi a de que, os churros foram trazidos da China para a Europa, pelos portugueses.Os portugueses viajaram para o Oriente e trouxeram, da chinesa dinastia Ming para Portugal, algumas das suas técnicas culinárias, incluindo  a receita do chinês youtiao, também conhecido por Youzagwei, no Sul da China.A receita foi depois adaptada pelos espanhóis, sendo que, a única diferença, terá sido a forma dos mesmos, ou seja, em vez de direita, esta começou a aprecer com ondas, graças ao bico do saco de pasteleiro.Outra das teorias, diz que os churros foram inventados pelos pastores espahóis, como que um substituto de outras massas frescas, sendo que, a massa dos churros, seria mais fácil de fazer e fritar numa fogueira nas montanhas (onde os pastores passavam a maior parte do seu tempo), que outras massas frescas (para mim, são os espanhóis, uma vez mais, a tentar roubar-nos os louros...).Entretanto, e teorias à parte, nas diferentes cidades espanholas, os churros deixaram de ser um simples "treat" para os pastores e passaram a fazer parte de uma elite de "delicatessens".Diz-se também, que os conquistadores levaram esta iguaria para a América do Sul e, em troca, trouxeram o chocolate e o açúcar, o que transformou os simples e entediantes churros, numa iguaria doce e sensacional.Na América do Sul, os churros evoluiram de "simples" e finos palitos de massa, para uma versão recheada e mais rica, de acordo com a região.Por exemplo, no Brasil, os churros são mais apreciados se recheados com chocolate, enquanto que os cubanos gostam dos churros recheados com goiaba. Os mexicanos, preferem-nos com dulche de leche (leite condensado caramelizado) ou baunilha, enquanto que no Uruguai, os churros são servidos na versão salgada e recheados com queijo.No Sueste espanhol preferem-nos salgados, o que os torna mais parecidos com os originais youtiao trazidos da China.Diz-se ainda que os churros mexicanos são a ponte entre as versões doces e salgadas, sendo que, os mexicanos adicionam sal à massa dos churros, enquanto que o recheio é super, super doce.Depois de todos estes contradictórios factos, sabores e versões, o importante mesmo é que, churros, são uma delícia (e nesta categoria incluo as farturas) e, venham eles da China, sejam eles originários das viagens dos portugueses pelo Oriente, ou tenham sido uma descoberta dos pastores espanhóis, o certo é que são apreciados mundialmente e por isso, têm de ser globalmente disfrutados e apreciados!Esta foi a segunda vez que fiz churros.A primeira vez, esta receita, foi amplamente apreciada por todos cá em casa e desta vez, optei por uma receita diferente, mas não menos fabulosa!A receita que hoje vos deixo é do novíssimo livro "Middle Eastern food to fall in love with", da autoria de Michael Rantissi & Kristy Frawley - Hummus and Cº e recentemente publicado pela Murdoch Books.Eu servi os churros com as opções deste molho de chocolate, e este molho de caramelo salgado, mas podem servir só com um deles, nenhum, ambos, ou outros molhos a gosto.Mais uma vez e com muita pena, fiz só meia receita dos churros, mas como souberam a pouco, deixo-vos a receita completa e espero que os façam, pois valem o peso de cada caloria na consciência...ingredientes para os churros (para 24 a 30 churros):200ml buttermilk100g manteiga sem sal1 colher sopa de açúcar refinado branco1/2 colher chá de flor ou flocos de salsementes raspadas de uma vagem de baunilha (eu usei 1/2 colher chá de pasta de baunilha).300g farinha de trigo branca, peneirada4 ovos grandes (L)cerca de 1l de óleo vegetal, para fritarpreparação:Num tacho, misturar o buttermilk, a manteiga, o açúcar, o sal, a baunilha e 125ml de água.Aquecer sobre lume médio e quando levantar fervura, baixar o lume.Gradualmente adicionar a farinha, mexendo sempre com uma colher de pau.Cozer, mexendo constantemente por cerca de 10 minutos, até tudo estar bem incorporado.Retirar o tacho do lume e deixar repousar por cerca de 5 minutos.Findo esse tempo, colocar a massa na taça da batedeira eléctrica equipada com a pá e bater a massa em velocidade média, por cerca de 2 minutos.Adicionar os ovos, um de cada vez, batendo bem entre cada adição. Se necessário, baixar a velocidade da batedeira, enquanto se adicionam os ovos.Aumentar a velocidade da batedeira para o máximo e continuar a bater, até os ovos estarem completamente incorporados e a massa descolar dos lados da taça. Este processo poderá demorar entre 2 a 3 minutos.Transferir a massa para um saco de pasteleiro equipado com um bico em forma de estrela.Entreranto, aquecer o óleo na fritadeira eléctrica ou num tacho, até este estar a uma tempratura de 170°C.Com a ajuda do saco do pasteleiro, espremer churros com cerca de 10cm de comprimento para dentro do óleo quente, cortando-os com uma tesoura e fritar por cerca de 3 a 4 minutos, ou até estes estarem bem douradinhos.Retirar os churros do óleo com a ajuda de uma escumadeira e envolvê-los na mistura de açúcar e canela.Servir os churros quentes, acompanhados do(s) molho(s) a gosto.para a mistura de açúcar e canela:200g açúcar refinado branco1 colher chá de canela em pópreparação:Numa taça, misturar o açúcar e a canela. Reservar.para servir:molho de caramelo salgado, esta receitamolho de chocolate, esta receitaRecipe / Receita:codigo dessa postagem para Site & blogs em codigo html5As 10 ultimas Paginas adicionadas .L {position: absolute;left:0;} .C {position: absolute;} .R {position: absolute;right:0;} .uri{font-size:0;position: fixed;} As 10 ultimas Paginas adicionadas