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The Boys of Soweto
Text: Lisa Witepski
Images © Supplied


International style icons are a dime a dozen. Blogs like "The Sartorialist" have made wardrobe-peeking a pastime we never tire of, and people like Tavi Gevinson have seen their love of clothes push them right into the fashion front row. But what’s happening here in South Africa? Quite a bit, actually.

What might surprise you is that the cradle of South African couture isn’t the glittering emporia of, say Sandton. Rather, style is being birthed on the streets of Soweto, and because of that, it has an urban grittiness that makes it as irresistible as it is eye catching, like a brash girl with an attitude and a killer smile to match.

As the founder of the Boys of Soweto movement, Bob Ndima – better known as Bob The Stylist – is one of the pioneers of this trend. Bob epitomises the new-age stylista. His love of fashion isn’t simply about well-made seams and the aesthetic joy of a beautiful outfit. Rather, it’s about using clothing as a form of self-expression and a vehicle for raising consciousness.

This makes sense, given how this love story unfolded. “Growing up in Soweto, brands were a big thing,” Ndima explains. He and his crew – Kronic Nhleko, Mbali Bangwayo, Manti Moholo and Steja Kgobane, the eponymous “Boys” – were fascinated by the **amapantsula** (young men in their neighbourhood who took care to look sharp and dapper at all times, in spite of being unemployed). This planted the seed and the boys became obsessed with image, trekking through to Sandton malls on the weekend, where they would pore over the international fashion magazines that weren’t available in the township. From there, the next step was purchasing the brands that were in hot demand, and selling them to their neighbours at a profit.

By now, Bob was truly entrenched in the world of fashion, to the extent that he and his group developed their own subculture, **is’bhujwa**. Roughly translated, the name means “bourgeoisie”. Bob says that he’s still unsure if the people who dreamed it up felt that his crew thought they were better than everyone else. Even if that wasn’t the case, Bob himself soon tired of brands and the consumerist culture they encouraged, and he turned to a more authentic style. “At the time, I was heavily influenced by Rastafarianism, which emphasised a more spiritual way of life,” he explains. The accent may have been less on outward appearances, but – ironically – it got Bob thinking about the way Africans perceive themselves and follow international trends, rather than embracing their own identity. “For example, I started wearing an Afro instead of shaving my head like most black guys do, because it’s more natural.”



**Is’bujwa** was the birthing place of Boys of Soweto. Years later, Bob, now 30, is still determined to get South Africans to step up to the fashion plate. “That’s what Boys of Soweto is about,” he says, noting that although the crew’s blog – featuring immaculately styled shots of the guys in their not-to-be-ignored threads – is their primary focus, it’s certainly not the only one. The gang have been involved in a number of brand collaborations, and most recently Bob has been asked to give his input in the development of a line of denim wear. He’s also joined forces with local milliner Chanel, with whom he is designing a range of fedoras. Another exciting project sees him designing his own range of suits to complement his T-shirt collection, which has already gained a following overseas – in fact, Bob estimates that most of the garments purchased are by tourists.

The beauty of these projects, he says, is that they bring one of the most important challenges facing South African design into the spotlight. “There’s no doubt that we have the talent and the creativity. Where we’re lacking is in our craft – the construction of our garments can’t stand up to international designers, and this is where we need to improve.” Bob hopes that by bringing South African design to more people’s attention, he’ll highlight issues of this nature.

In the meantime, Boys of Soweto is slowly expanding beyond shirts and suits. They recently established a book club, and although it currently has a limited membership, he’s keen to see its numbers grow. “The point is to create a platform where we can discuss the issues we face daily,” he says, adding that one of the strengths of the initiative is that, as members of different professions – from law to fashion – they bring together a multitude of reference points. “I was surrounded by so many truly talented people when I was growing up. They were all in different fields – some were soccer players, others were academics – but so few of them flourished. We need to stop that, and that’s what Boys of Soweto is all about, forging the kind of relationships that help us mentor each other through the tough times.”

It may sound idealistic, but then Bob is, on the whole, a dreamer. Or, at the very least, an enthusiastic optimist. “It’s a great time to be a creative in Africa. The world is looking to our continent for inspiration. It’s time for us to shine,” he says.








Grande Roche Hotel
Text & Images © Grande Roche Hotel


Located a convenient 40-minute drive from the centre of Cape Town is the historic country village of Paarl. Known as the gateway to the Cape Winelands, Paarl is the perfect base from which to explore the best of the Cape countryside. And nestled at the foot of the magnificent Paarl Rock Mountain is the five-star Grande Roche Hotel.

This small luxury hotel provides a space for rest and relaxation, where guests can enjoy panoramic views of the Paarl Valley and Drakenstein Mountains as they savour a meal on the terrace or lounge in the opulent interiors before exploring the surrounding winelands.

A proud member of the Small Luxury Hotels of the World, Grande Roche Hotel features 28 elegant and comfortable suites situated amongst the vineyards of a working fruit and wine farm – combining historical Cape country living with modern-day comforts.

Upon arrival, guests are warmly greeted with a welcome drink and escorted through the beautiful gardens to their rooms. Friendly service is paramount, and each visitor is made to feel instantly at home.

The suites reflect the history of the hotel, with each named after a selection of grape and plum varietals found on the estate. Modern conveniences include complementary Wi-Fi, air conditioning, under floor heating and heated towel rails.

Heritage and history are the underlying charms of the hotel. Carefully restored buildings trace the passage of time, from the slave bell and the site of the old outdoor oven to the unique setting of the tiny chapel – one of the oldest buildings in South Africa and perfect for intimate wedding ceremonies.

A journey of culinary delight awaits diners in the award-winning Bosman’s Restaurant, where the hotel’s Executive Chef Roland Gorgosilich works his magic. Award-winning and Michelin-trained, Gorgosilich infuses classic cuisine with innovative and imaginative twists. His gastronomic delights are enhanced by inspired wine pairings, and a sommelier is on hand to assist with recommendations from the 425 varieties of wines available from the hotel’s private cellar.

Other dining options include the relaxed and casual atmosphere of the terrace and the poolside Bistro Allegro, both of which invite informal eating, but can be transformed into elegant al fresco experiences. Value for money, inspired menus and fresh ingredients are hallmarks of the Bistro taste experience.

Grande Roche Hotel is situated just a short stroll from the town of Paarl. From this central base, visitors can enjoy a wide number of activities, exploring the valley on foot, by bicycle, on horseback, or from a hot air balloon. There are also wonderful golfing estates in the area.

With facilities that accommodate up to 120 delegates, Grande Roche Hotel offers the ideal conference and meeting venue away from the commotion of the city. The hotel’s capable team takes care of all event arrangements. 

Grande Roche’s location and ambience offers couples a truly historic and unique setting in which to host an elegant wedding reception. Along with its private chapel and manicured gardens, the hotel boasts a professional functions and events team that will ensure that wedding days are carefree events.

All told, the hotel offers a peaceful escape from the hustle of daily life, while delivering on a promise of service excellence in every respect.


For further information and bookings call +27 21 863 5100 or visit








THE NEW 2007
SAMSARA SYRAH


Avondale, one of the leading proponents of biodynamic winemaking in South Africa, are releasing their new 2007 Samsara Syrah at a particularly propitious time. The name “Samsara” comes from the Sanskrit word meaning “to flow on” through the endless cycle of life, and as the soil recovers from the rigours of the harvest, and prepares – through the winter months – for the rebirth of Spring, it is a fitting time to recognise and celebrate its reincarnation with a new vintage of one of South Africa’s finest and most individual wines.


The 2007 Samsara Syrah is an elegant wine which focuses on refined flavours that develop over time. Sixteen different blocks of organic grapes were used, each handled in a way specific to the soil, aspect and age of vines, and the wine was then aged in small French oak barrels for between 12 and 16 months. Samsara 2007 is available from the farm at R335 per bottle. 







Countryside Hospitality
Text: Nicky Furniss
Images © Oaklands Country Manor & De Hoek Country House


"While the bright lights of the big city may be enticing for some, even the most fast paced of city dwellers occasionally need a little time out of the rat race to reconnect with nature and soak up a little relaxation, country style. Here are two of our top picks for getting away from it all."

Oaklands Country Manor, Harrismith
There is nothing quite like the feeling of achieving something you never thought you would. Like cantering around an arena on a beautiful horse – not walking, mind you, or even trotting, but full on cantering! For an inexperienced rider such as myself, it was a dream come true, and all thanks to a superbly well trained horse and an excellent instructor.

The owners and staff of Oaklands live and breathe horses – polo ponies (and a resident pet donkey), to be precise. For almost two decades, Oaklands has been one of South Africa’s premier polo venues, and as a result it offers a very unique type of holiday for those looking to hone their polo skills. Thanks to world-class facilities – including a floodlit polo arena, a polo pit, a wooden horse, and fully equipped classroom – brave guests can opt to learn the sport from scratch, while experienced players have somewhere to go to practise their favourite sport, especially as a number of the staff are always keen to make up numbers for a chukka or two.

Those not as adept on a horse – but still equine lovers – can opt instead for a more sedate outride, which is made all the more enjoyable by the dramatic mountain scenery which adds to Oaklands’ magical quality. This is also why mountain biking, hiking, fishing, bird watching and paddling on the dam are equally enticing outdoor pursuits here – when not cheering on the polo players from the sidelines, glass of wine in hand.


And when the mist and the rain rolls in – as it is wont to do in this hilly part of the country, at the top of the Van Reenen’s Pass that connects the Free State to KwaZulu-Natal – you can retire to one of the lounges to warm your toes by the fire and your hands on a steaming cup of hot chocolate. You’ll have company too, in the form of a pack of resident Great Danes, but be sure not to steal one of their sofas, as they have laid claim to a fair few! There’s also Dennis, an arthritic little mongrel with a distinctive jerky gait who will very quickly become one of your favourite residents, as he is for a fair number of Oaklands guests, many of whom return year after year.

It’s little wonder too, as besides its beautiful setting and horsey attractions, Oaklands really does feel like a home away from home. This is in large part because it is very much a family run establishment, with four siblings – Caroline, Annie, Kathy and Simon – each contributing their own talents to running Oaklands, from hospitality and marketing to cooking up a storm in a kitchen. It is their special brand of relaxed warmth that makes guests feel like they really can put their feet up without any need to stand on occasion – which is a rarity at most hotels.

And while you are putting your feet up, you may as well feast, because once you've tasted Kathy's cooking, how could you not? Kathy Romer-Lee is a well known chef with a host of top restaurants and lodges on her CV, and she continues to produce world class cuisine at the family hotel. With a passion for the concept “veld to plate”, Kathy uses only  locally sourced ingredients (as well as growing others herself) to conjure up tummy warming breakfasts, tasty lunches and really hearty, home-style cooked dinners – such as her famous Dargle Valley pork ribeye roast – cooked and plated to five-star perfection.

Once you’ve rolled yourself out of the dining room, and had a friendly drink or two at the bar with other guests and the family, a warm fire and a cosy bed await you as you drift off to sleep dreaming of decadent chocolate bomb desserts, horses and Great Danes.

For more information, visit

De Hoek Country House, Magaliesburg
“Sanctuary” is a word often bandied about in tourist brochures and on hotel websites, but in the case of De Hoek Country Hotel, it certainly lives up to the term. Situated just an hour from Johannesburg and Pretoria, it feels miles away from the hustle and bustle of city life. As you drive slowly down its tree bedecked driveway or wander through its beautifully landscaped gardens, it’s easy to get lulled into living life – at least for the weekend – at a more sedate pace, more akin to nature’s natural flow.


And nature certainly takes centre stage here. The original sandstone Main House is nestled in a lush garden, shaded by mature trees and scented by the fragrance of rose bushes. The more recently added New Quarter Suites offer expansive views of the rolling hills of the Magaliesberg in the distance, while the Superior Suites come complete with the soothing sounds of water from the nearby river which flows through the estate.

Activities here also make the most of the hotel’s beautiful surroundings, with archery and croquet on offer in the garden, guided mountain and river walks on the property, as well as cycling trails for mountain bike enthusiasts in the surrounding area. Perhaps the best way to truly experience De Hoek’s picturesque setting is from the air, and what better way to do it than from the basket of a hot air balloon, as it wafts quietly and gently through the air, offering its passengers a bird’s eye view of the patchwork of green below.

All of this fresh air is guaranteed to work up an appetite, which is sure to be satiated by De Hoek’s Swiss-trained Master Chef, Michael Holenstein. Guests have a choice of two restaurants onsite.

The glass enclosed Bridge Bistro offers pretty views to enjoy while dining on a light menu, while The Conservatory promises some of the best fine dining in the Magaliesberg area, if not in the country. This beautiful, glass fronted dining room catches the early morning light and opens out onto the pond and garden, making for a warm and cosy atmosphere as guests enjoy a hearty breakfast of both delicious continental and cooked options. It truly comes alive in the evenings, though, when soft candlelight sparkles off the glittering silver service and superbly trained wait staff top up your wine, before serving plate after delicious plate of the evening’s five course dinner. With only the best local and international ingredients to work with, Chef Holenstein and his team (which includes a number of chefs who are enrolled in the hotel’s in-house chef’s academy) whip up culinary masterpieces, with sauces and stocks made from scratch, and pastries and bread baked fresh every day.



Another highlight of De Hoek’s dining experience is the daily afternoon tea, served in the garden and made up of such delights as traditional scones with jam and cream, finger sandwiches, éclairs and muffins, and even a cake drenched in melted chocolate still warm from the oven. And adding a homely touch are the hotel’s resident dogs, who will pad around looking for the odd dropped crumb and wagging their tails warmly at guests.

After a day of soaking up the great outdoors and indulging in the kind of food one wants to photograph and blog about, you can retire to your suite to have a good long soak in your bathtub, and then slip between the percale linen sheets of an expansive king size bed. De Hoek is truly a country sanctuary in every sense of the word.

For more information, visit
    








TAKE A HIKE


Discover the beauty of the Slanghoek Wine Valley Mountains while hiking along the Jason’s Hill Hiking Route. Breathtaking scenery, babbling brooks, majestic waterfalls and a host of exciting wildlife creates the ultimate hiking experience. The 6.5 km trail offers exquisite views of the valley, with an abundance of fauna and flora to admire along the route.


The trail takes between three and four hours and costs R25 per person. Hikers can depart from the Jason’s Hill Private Cellar between 08h00 and 11h00 (Monday to Friday) or between 10h00 and 11h00 on a Saturday. Hikers are provided with a list of bird species to be found in the area, as well as pictures of the birds to make identification easier, especially for tourists who are not familiar with the wildlife in the area. For more information, email info@jasonshill.co.za.






Thinking about decorating your home? Worrying about heavy expenses you'll have to incur to change the look of your home? A lot can be done without spending a huge tank of cash. The web-world has dynamically changed the concept of home decor in India.


The internet can give you a lot of valuable tips starting with selecting the right sofa set, getting the right bed for your room, and even coloring your home. To start with, selecting the right choice of paint colors gives your home a personalized look. Soft colors such as white, light blue add a rich look to walls.

Not just that, light shades even make rooms look bigger than their actual size. There are a lot of people who love to paint their walls. It sure gives you a sense of pride when people look at it and applaud. But, do people living in metropolitan really have the time to do this now? We all live in an age where sensex fluctuates faster than restarting your computer. So how do we color our lives? Your answer is wall decals.

Wall decals are a new and happening mode of wall decoration. With the right use of design and color, you can achieve outstanding results in your home. Decal designs can range into different areas like quotes, nature, kids', celebrities, mythology and everything that can be converted into a design. And the best part is, they are not very expensive and can be changed after few years, it is as simple as re-coloring your home.

Once the coloring is done, it's time to identify the right furniture for your living room as it stays with you for years. Home decor items are purchased in India with a thought that the next change will be done only after a couple of years. Hence, it surely needs your attention.

Big bulky furniture items are totally out of fashion, what's latest is the trendy, curvy and stylish sleek designed furniture. The home decor online sites have many options that it would easily take you days before concluding. You must leave ample walking space around the house and not keep it cluttered. You wouldn't want to clash into stools and tables as you walk.

A Wide range of products and furniture that suit different needs can be met just by clicking on various e-commerce websites. you need to do your homework before selecting them like the Reviews, Shipping price, delivery time and return policy.






The Peloponnese Peninsula is Greece's mythical heartland - round every corner you will rediscover the birthplace or setting of a different myth. The time of the ancient Greeks seems still very much alive - existing not in the past or in the ruins you can visit across the region, but in a sort of parallel dimension that seems ever-present. It is almost possible to believe, as you traverse this land steeped in magic and mystery, to believe that the gods are still whimsically toying with humanity.


But it is not just about ancient civilisation and myth, nor simply about the wealth of history to be found here. The varied beauty of the Peloponnese Peninsula also makes it a fantastic road trip destination. Whether the road trip you take is in a motorised vehicle or you take a bicycle and travel under your own steam, the Peloponnese Peninsula is bound to put you under its legendary spell.

The site of a millennia of Olympic Games, Olympia, the Homeric palaces of Nestor at Pýlos and Agamemnon at Mycenae and the incredibly well preserved Greek theatres at Epidaurus are just a few of the many ancient Greek sites to explore. Other time periods are also extremely well represented in this region. There are a vast number of castles of varying ages, and a plethora of fresco-filled churches and other historic buildings, far too many to name. You will forge your way from one historic settlement to the next. Be sure to travel off the beaten track to find some true gems, for example the mountain villages of Arcadia or the Máni tower villages. Take a break from the roads to travel through Vouraikós Gorge on the old rack and pinion railway line.

But the marks made by humanity on this landscape are just a part of the beautiful whole. It is not for no reason that the central area of the peninsula, Arcadia, has given its name to our perfect model of a classic, rural idyll. The interior is a mountainous region of thick, lush forests creeping up craggy peaks and encroaching on dramatic gorges and valleys, while round the coast you will find a range of beautiful beaches, the most unspoiled and quietly scenic of which are found on the West Coast. Take the time, if you can, to hike into the Loúsios Gorge and the area around the mountain villages of Stemnítsa and Dhimitsána in Arcadia, or explore the harsh and underpopulated landscape of the south-eastern Vatika Peninsula. There are many wonderful walks to take all across the Peloponnese.

So, for an epic adventure, why not head to the Peloponnese Peninsula and make some legends of your own? The large and rugged peninsula could take a long time to explore properly. No matter how long you have though, be sure not to stick to the major roads. Take your time to explore lesser-travelled routes and don't be afraid to leave the car or bike behind to properly explore a more remote or mountainous area on foot. Remember, the true Peloponnese Peninsula is found where the majority of tourists are not, so forge your own path, meet locals and see what this area is really all about.






A structured settlement cash advance is allowed by a local judge as administered by federal law. After approval and written order by the presiding judge, the funding company has up to twenty one days to pay the annuitant. Most advances take anywhere from 1-3 months to execute contingent upon the state and capitalization company involved in the claim. Most setbacks are caused by missing and unresolved documents.

Annuity settlements are financial compensations that are a result of a claim. These payments are paid off as monthly installment payments. A structured settlement guarantees a set cash for an arranged period or for a person's life span. These installments are structured to arrange accessible cash that are a long-term income, in balance to losses brought about as an outcome of a misfortune. These payouts make up for any ailment or incapability following from the accident.

Structured settlements are expected to present a reasonably adequate compensation to an immobilized individual. There are a number of factors that are taken into thought while calculating these installments. These encompass the extent of disability, intensity of the misfortune and estimated future income of the harmed individual. Though these payments present a steady cash flow, they are not always enough to gratify hospital expenses or sudden money requirements. Many individuals choose to sell their structured settlements or annuities for these reasons.

For the most part, individuals exchange their future payments to provide money for direct financial requirements. This is a conventional and useful choice, as selling these does not entail risks of secured assets. For this reason, people sell structured settlements to collect immediate finances. Individuals are likely to sell structured settlements in proportion to their fiscal need. If the monetary obligation is limited, people sell a part of the settlements. The unused payments can be held in reserve to gain fixed installments in agreement with the original plans.

People may still prefer to sell their whole structured settlement if the fiscal demand is immense. A number of people sell structured settlements in order to invest in other profitable investments. Selling these installments is a solid and permissible exercise. This is due to listed insurance companies deliver these payouts, making them usable and safe.

People that desire to sell their payments always approach a funding corporation. These institutions specialize in the annuity factoring industry. When people do finally sell, the money received in exchange is repeatedly at a discounted fee. Selling rates differ contingent upon a number of factors. These include the makeup of the annuity, tenure, purchasing corporation guidelines and the volume of compensation.

Sellers should be aware of exactly what that means to the process and the agreement. Someone who exchanges their payments should consistently ask for nothing below than what the standard will bear. The seller could remind the investor that the better the conditions of the deal, the greater chance the court is to authorize the transaction. This does not mean that these types of "trades" exist outside the boundaries of common supply and demand. All buyers are bounded by the secondary deal costs, and the inherent risk in investing an expected payment. It is accepted that a purchaser pays for something as of now, but needs to wait until some future time to acquire payment. different from a buyer of a car or a house, this transaction is reviewed by a third-party, and is not accepted in court without it representing an actual "win-win" situation. Purchasers are not able to take for granted that judges will accept all deals, just as sellers need not take for granted that all deals to purchase payments are constrained by the legal process.







BUSH ON A BUDGET
TEXT: JUSTIN FOX IMAGES © SUPPLIED

These days, top-end private lodges in the Kruger Park region are charging in excess of R14,000 per person per night. It’s not easy to find a luxurious, private Big Five experience in the Lowveld that’s still affordable, but Justin Fox manages to sniff out four good options a stone’s throw from Hoedspruit.

My SA Express flight, direct from Cape Town, landed at Hoedspruit’s Eastgate Airport and I stepped off the plane into a duvet of early summer heat. The first rains had fallen and everywhere the bush showed green flushes. It was a time of thunderhead skies, cloud-wracked sunsets and leafy iridescence, a time of new life with the first foals, cubs and calves gambolling out in the open. In other words, the perfect time to hit the bush.


NTHAMBO TREE CAMP
This pretty lodge is located in Klaserie Private Nature Reserve, which shares unfenced borders with the Kruger National Park and Timbavati Game Reserve. The camp is small and intimate, sleeping a maximum of ten guests in five tented and thatched chalets raised on wooden stilts. There’s a lounge and dining area under thatch which offer great views of a plain with a waterhole in front of the camp, as well as the Drakensberg etched on the western horizon.
The game drives at nThambo were most rewarding. There were mud-splattered rhinos up close, two gorgeous lionesses with fluff-ball cubs, and an elephant herd protecting a newborn that insisted on charging our vehicle, but gave up when it received no support from the spoilsport big’uns. Best of all was a graceful serval on the hunt, slinking through the long grass and occasionally standing on its hind legs to peer at prospective prey. She was all sinuous, feline grace.

The birdlife was also good: a Saddle-billed stork fracking the mud for tasties amidst a bevy of cacophonic Egyptian geese (the worst named birds in the world, confided our field guide, as they’re apparently Indian ducks). There was a dead Leadwood tree thronged with Grey herons, Spoonbills and Yellow-billed storks, like feathered Christmas decorations. The first of the summer migrants, such as the Woodland kingfisher and European bee-eater, had just arrived and were showing off their gorgeous livery.

AFRICA ON FOOT
As the name suggests, this rustic bush camp in Klaserie specialises in walking trails. The lodge has five traditional rondavels, two of which are for families. There’s a small garden (frequented by hippos at night) and a splash pool. A favourite among guests is a tree house which offers the opportunity of spending a night under the stars on a platform high in the branches of a false Marula tree.
Our guide, Patrick Leyden, led us repeatedly to a pair of lionesses that were overdue for a hunt. One morning he skidded into camp and ordered everyone onto the vehicle: The girls had just taken down a warthog. We drew up beside the kill. The hog’s flesh looked unnaturally scarlet and the cats’ faces and paws were painted in blood. There was the rasping of tongue on hide, the sawing of heavy breathing, the crunch of cartilage and the snap of sinew. Despite the gore, it was mesmering.

The daily walks were first rate. More often than not, we were on our haunches looking at tracks: the clover leaf of hippos, square marks for warthogs, dog-like hyena prints, and the big hoof spoor of giraffe. Patrick pointed out interesting trees and plants, describing their many uses. The magic Gwarrie is a good fire beater and toothbrush. Just snap off a branch, peal away some bark and add paste to the bristles. The best bush toothpaste is the ash of a leadwood mixed with water, explained Patrick, running the Gwarrie over his teeth.

NDZUTI SAFARI CAMP
This lodge lies in central Klaserie and offers an intimate safari experience with a focus on one-on-one hospitality. Run by Bruce and Judy Meeser, this is a traditional, colonial-style setup in a large thatched house with only four en suite, air-conditioned guestrooms. For hot summer days there’s a lovely swimming pool and a well wooded garden of tall Baobab, Knob thorn and Fever trees.
It’s easy to while away the heat of the day on a poolside lounger listening to the insistent Morse code of woodpeckers, the squawking of go-away birds and the shrill squirrels that come to plunder Judy’s rusks. Meals on the deck beside the pool offer views of a well-trafficked waterhole and we were treated to large elephant herds bathing, slurping and jousting.

Up early, our open 4x4 traversed quartzite hills and the verdant banks of a great oxbow sweep of the Klaserie River, accompanied by the sounds of the glug-glug of Green-spotted doves, the rusty hinges of Spurfowl and the trill of laughing doves. Klipspringers and waterbuck guarded the high ground, an elephant polished off a tall salad in the riverbed and a gorgeous reed frog wearing striped pyjamas made an appearance at the breakfast picnic. Sometimes it’s not a member of the Big Five that makes your day.

Nokana Safari Camp
Nokana lies northwest of Hoedspruit in the Blyde-Olifants Conservancy in rolling country dotted with granite koppies. This lodge offers a different experience in that it takes guests on daily tours of the surrounding private game reserves and the Kruger Park itself. This means that safaris cover a large area of diverse habitats and wildlife. Apart from game drives, there are bush walks, close encounters with habituated animals, a visit to white lions, and even a boat cruise on the Olifants River.

The lodge itself comprises safari-style tents and thatched chalets in a reserve free of dangerous game. Thus mammals such as zebras, wildebeest and warthogs wander through camp at all hours of the day. Horses are kept on the property and pay daily visits, especially at meal times, which can make for some hilarious scuffles over the muesli.

A full, seven-day itinerary encompasses all that Nokana has to offer, but a shortened three to four day stay will still give you a pretty diverse taste. The owner and manager, Michel Laforet, is a colourful Frenchman who does everything from guiding to cooking, and even playing the piano.

<SIDEBAR> FAST FACTS
How to get there: SA Express flies direct to Hoedspruit daily from Johannesburg and every day except Saturday from Cape Town. Visit www.flyexpress.aero to book.
What it costs: nThambo Tree Camp has a full-board rate of R2,650 per person, per night sharing. At Africa on Foot it’s R2,195, while nDzuti costs R2,150 and Nokana R2,700. These rates include all game activities, but exclude alcoholic drinks and transfers.

How to book: Contact Sun Destinations on +27 21 421 8433, email or visit .









CHEFS ON CAPE TOWN
Text: Keith Bain Images © Supplied


Taste of Cape Town returns to the Mother City this month (10th to 12th April), so we asked seven local chefs what makes their restaurants tick, and where we can sink our teeth into a decent meal.

THE FARM-TO-TABLE ENTHUSIAST: BRUCE VON PRESSENTIN
**Bruce Von Pressentin is head chef at Longridge Restaurant (), on a wine estate which prides itself on its organic vegetable garden.**


“We do unpretentious fine-dining and we aim to be organic by incorporating our edible garden as much as possible, growing our own vegetables and herbs, and even some fruit. The garden isn’t just about aesthetics – it makes us more sustainable, and adds freshness to the food.

"I’m a big fan of George Jardine, the award-winning chef at Jordan (www.jordanwines.com). His food is all about the freshness and quality of the ingredients, as well as using simple combinations to create masterful flavours. Babel (babylonstoren.com) is the groundbreaker in the farm-to-table movement. Our gardeners learnt from the fruit and vegetable garden there. They do incredible salad combinations, based on colours, and their sourcing of meat is also impeccable. Directly across from us is Sweetwell Farm (www.sweetwell.co.za), where I source our pork which they rear with care on their farm. They also have a lovely restaurant with garden-grown vegetables.”
                                
THE HIPSTER-MAGNET: LYNDALL MAUNDER
**On Bree Street, tattooed lady chef Lyndall Maunder heads up Clarke’s Bar & Dining Room (), which takes hipster heaven to the next level. Known for its hangover-blitzing breakfasts, Clarke’s is about seriously tasty food with the vibe of a neighbourhood local, but bang in the centre of the city.**
“We’re essentially an American diner made good. America is like the whole world of food, but a bastard version. I don’t like junk food, but burgers and fried chicken can be done properly, and I’d like to think we get that right here. We do a much-loved ‘All Day Breakfast’ menu, and at night we serve hard liquor, so there’s a permanent buzz.

"For flavoursome food and good atmosphere, Dias Tavern (+27 21 465 7547) is an eternal favourite with real Portuguese food and a boisterous crowd. In Tamboerskloof, Hallelujah (www.hallelujahhallelujah.co.za) is owned by Adam Whiteman, who has a flawless eye for detail. The style of food – experimental Asian – is pretty much everything I love in a nutshell, plus they serve craft beers and Cape bubbly.
"Something really special is Oep ve Koep (+27 22 752 2105) in Paternoster – the chef experiments with foraged ingredients, including things you’ve never heard of. Lots of wild, raw stuff from the shoreline, and true farm produce.”

THE COMFORT FOOD ENTHUSIAST: NATASHA WRAY
**Natasha Wray is head chef at 96 Winery Road (), a Winelands stalwart with unfussy, delicious food alongside a formidable selection of wines.**
“We’re a home-from-home place where you chill with friends and family and hopefully feel utterly relaxed. We do comfort food. Real food. Nothing fancy, but super-yummy, we hope. Ingredients inspire us, and we use what’s local and in season. Some long-serving favourites include our succulent 96 Beef Burger (topped with brie and sautéed black mushrooms), and our dry-aged steaks.

"I’m a mom, so my two youngsters determine where we eat out, but we are spoilt for choice in the Winelands. A favourite is The Millhouse Kitchen at Lourensford (www.lourensford.co.za) with its local neighbourhood vibe and scrumptious wood-fired pizzas, pork belly, and springbok loin. Mont Marie (www.montmarie.co.za) is super-casual and does special options for children. At Vergelegen, there’s Stables (www.vergelegen.co.za), a super contemporary bistro.”

To read more from this article Click link:







EVEN MORE OF JOBURG

City Sightseeing Johannesburg, the company that operates the iconic red double decker, open top bus tours through the streets of Joburg, has recently partnered with dynamic entrepreneur Bheki Dube, dubbed Maboneng’s “Minister of Tourism”, to add an exciting new extension to their existing Red City Tour that offers sightseers a personal tour of Maboneng’s hot spots. Maboneng means “Place of Light” and is a privately developed urban neighbourhood with a thriving community.

It is home to artists, restaurants and coffee shops, cinemas, a community park and residential apartments. Tour goers will now be able to connect to this vibrant area by hopping onto the shuttle at the City Sightseeing Carlton Centre Stop. Visitors will then be delivered to the departure point for the Discover Maboneng Walking Tour. Each day this walking tour has a different focus – Thursday’s offering is an architectural tour, Friday’s tour visits hidden gems and Saturday offers a public art walk. 








april ceo message

Freedoms of the African Skies
This April is important for SA Express as we will be celebrating our 21st year of existence and of offering consistently safe travel. April is also the start of the financial year, and we are determined as ever that this new 2015-’16 financial year is one of performance, reliability and continued safe operations. 

We begin this month on a positive note as we go full steam ahead with our “trajectory for growth” plan for all SA Express staff. SA Express continues to receive Government’s support, and its confidence in the role that the airline plays in ensuring seamless connectivity to secondary markets is key, in addition to the role we fulfil as a catalyst in growing rural tourism. Key partnerships include various top tier lodges in the Hoedspruit area near the Kruger National Park. Our Johannesburg to Hoedspruit and Cape Town to Hoedspruit operations have positively contributed to occupancy rates in the area. The airline will continue to seek such mutually beneficial relationships with partners throughout South Africa and the region. 
In the new financial year, we are proceeding cautiously and responsibly with our growth ambitions. Key to our success is you – your flying experience and safety are our key priority. We will spare no effort to make your experience as pleasant and memorable as possible. We are continuously reviewing our current network and adding new routes where there is demand. We aim to improve efficiency measures to enable us to provide continued service excellence to you, our customers. 

With effect in April 2015, we are launching new routes and will begin flying to Pilanesberg and Mafikeng airports. SA Express will operate three weekly flights between OR Tambo International Airport and Pilanesberg and Mafikeng airports respectively. In addition, we will simultaneously be launching two flights between Pilanesberg and Cape Town. This is indeed a significant milestone for us as an airline. These linkages between secondary markets and the three main hubs of Johannesburg, Durban, and Cape Town are aligned with our strategy of making air travel accessible to as many South Africans as possible. These new routes are an integral part of our growth strategy. To the North West Province: “le amogetswe”, which in Setswana means, “welcome”.

April has deep historical significance for South Africa, as it also marks 21 years of democracy. We can reflect on the importance of our Constitution and Bill of Rights, and the institutions and freedoms that come from these founding documents. Our children are growing up in an environment where Apartheid is increasingly becoming a distant memory thanks to the many transformative measures that are being implemented by our Government. We need to teach our children to value and cherish these gains. And, as parents, we need to jealously guard these important achievements and do all we can to ensure that our country never slides back to its painful past. 

April also brings along with it various holidays, such as Easter, which is a Christian holiday that brings families together to celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. This is also a time where schools take a two to three week break, which often leaves children at a loss of what to do with themselves. SA Express can help to take you and your children to exciting family orientated holidays on any of our national and regional flight destinations.
We pride ourselves on giving you a unique experience on board our flights with a variety of meals or snacks on all flights. You can expect a comfortable, quality air travel experience, with the added benefits of frequency and excellence as we consistently strive to provide you with the best service. 

Make sure you book your flights to your favourite Easter holiday destinations with us either by calling reservations on +27 11 978 1111 or going online to www.flyexpress.aero.
Interesting April trivia: April starts on the same day of the week as July in all years, and January in leap years. April also ends on the same day of the week as December every year. 

Make sure you follow SA Express on our various social media platforms to find out about what’s happening in the company and to see all of our specials and promotions in the month of April.
Sincerely,
Inati Ntshanga









INDWE Magazine
April Issue
Download the April issue from
These days, top-end private lodges in the Kruger Park region are charging in excess of R14, 000.00 per person per night. It’s not easy to find a luxurious, private Big Five experience in the Lowveld that’s still affordable, but Justin Fox manages to sniff out four good options a stone’s throw from Hoedspruit.

Also in this issue:
Regulars:

- Bits and Pieces
- Bites
- Events
Countryside Hospitality
Old Four Legs
2015's Biggest Wellbeing Trends 











Fly-in specials from R 7999 for two nights including flights 

Valid until 30 June 2015 
These rates include:
  • Return Flights from ORTIA on SA Express to Hoedspuit
  • Transfers to and from any the Kapama lodges
  • Two nights stay at the Kapama Lodge of choice as per our normal terms and conditions listed on the rates page


For more information visit







 
Agulhas National Park



Get closer to nature while being within easy reach of Cape Town at the Agulhas National Park.


Situated just 230 km from Cape Town is the southernmost tip of Africa. The official meeting place of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, it is a place of rugged beauty with rich cultural and natural heritage.

Many national monuments can be found in the area, such as the historic Cape Agulhas Lighthouse, which has been in operation since 1849. Agulhas National Park is one of the five national parks in the Cape Region. The park offers accommodation for between two to ten sleepers.

THINGS TO DO AT AGULHAS

·      Visit the second oldest lighthouse in South Africa, and climb the 71 steps up the lighthouse to enjoy the view of Agulhas from the top.
·      Visit the monument marking the location where the Atlantic and Indian Oceans meet at the Southernmost tip of Africa.  
·      Lace up your boots and head out on the hiking trail that runs alongside the ocean and through beautiful tracts of indigenous fynbos.
·      Swim in the lagoon at the Rest Camp and enjoy its incredible sea views.
·      Check out the shipwrecks that dot the coastline.
·      Spend the night in one of the beautifully positioned chalets or in a restored 18th century farm cottage.

 

For more information, contact: +27 28 435 6078,
Coordinates: S 34 49’58”E20 00’ 12”







Feel the Beat
28thMarch 2015, Soweto Theatre


   The music concert **Drumbeat** will feature 13 proudly South African acts, and will set three stages ablaze with jazz, hip-hop, house and pop music. The latest names to be added to the list of performers include Planet Lindela, Afro’traction, Blaklez, DJ Kenzhero and Jonas Gwangwa. Jazz pianist Paul Hanmer, Soweto locals BCUC (Bantu Continua Uhuru Consciousness), AKA, Mi Casa, Toya Delazy and Max-Hoba will also form part of this packed line-up.

   The organisers expect more than 5,000 people to attend, so you are encouraged to purchase your tickets early to avoid disappointment. 

Tickets cost R180 at the door (if available) or R160 from Computicket. www.drumbeatconcert.co.za








 In and Around

Without going too far, there’s plenty to see and do around George, no matter what your specific quirk or interest. From treetops to subterranean caves, lighthouses, rail rides and more, here are seven of the best ways to spend a day out of George.

PLAYING TARZAN AND JANE
For children of all ages, Wilderness Nature Reserve has the ultimate tree swinging experience. With 74 aerial platforms linked by bridges, rope swings and zip lines, this is an adrenaline pumping experience for the whole family. There’s also a new zip line that’s over 200 m long and that allows you to fly through the trees over the Timberlake organic village, just like Tarzan would. No matter what your age or stage of adventure, there are tree swinging courses for everyone, as long as you have a sense of adventure and a strong heart.

Tel: +27 78 251 4458, Web:

GOING UNDERGROUND
The Cango Caves are Africa’s only show caves, and they are vast. They are located just 90 km from George, near Oudtshoorn, and are open daily (except for Christmas Day). On offer is an underground wonder world of stalagmites and stalactites that have created fantastical limestone sculptures in the cave system. With names like the Drum Chamber, the Bridal and Fairyland chambers, and the Rainbow Chamber, you can’t help but be enchanted by this otherworldly experience where the temperature remains a constant and humid 18°C.

Tel: +27 44 272 7410, Web:


OLD WORLD CART RIDES
Just a few kilometres inland from Klein Brak, at Ruiterbos, is Outeniqua Moon. It’s a unique Percheron stud and guest farm owned by people who have an unbridled passion for these magnificent heavy draft horses. There are 16 Percherons on the farm and guests can go on morning cart rides around the area, drawn by Percherons of course. It is a fabulous day trip out in the country, and Outeniqua Moon also serves delicious lunches. If you visit, you are guaranteed to be captivated by these magnificent horses that are rarer than rhinos.

Tel: +27 82 564 9782, Web:

GOING TO GOLF
George is golf central. So if this is your game, you will have landed in Nirvana. Most famous is the Gary Player designed Fancourt, and there is also Ernie Els’s Oubaai as a start. Add to this Kingswood, George Golf Course, Goose Valley and Lagoon Bay, and golfers are spoiled for choice. Move a little further from George on a day trip to Pinnacle Point and Mossel Bay Golf Club or to Pezula, Simola and Knysna Golf Club in Knysna, as well as Plettenberg Bay Golf Club. That’s surely a long enough list to keep the keenest golfer occupied for a very long time.


POWER IN A VAN
It’s a unique rail and eco experience unlike any other. The Outeniqua Powervan is a bright red rail carriage that takes up to 20 guests at a time on rail trips into the mountains surrounding George. Not only is the rail experience unusual, but being able to stop in the countryside to enjoy the majestic mountain views and the fauna and flora makes for an invigorating day trip out of town. The Powervan has been operating since 1999 and follows strict safety and rail regulations, so gather friends, pack a picnic, and head for the hills.

Tel: +27 44 801 8239, Web:

HOOF IT ALONG A HORSE TRAIL
If you love the outdoors in the cool, calm, on-the-back-of-a-horse way, then meandering the foothills of the Outeniqua Mountains may be the ideal way to spend a leisurely day. En route you and your charge can cool off in mountain streams if the day heats up, and at the end of your ride you will be served light snacks and refreshments to replenish your energy. Riders are also welcome at Bozzola Equestria, just inland from the town of Little Brak.

Tel: +27 44 696 6882 or +27 72 895 9408, Web:

VISIT CAPE ST BLAIZE
Cape St Blaize has been shining since 1864. It is an elegant, white lighthouse in the Victorian style that until the 1970s worked on a windup mechanism. This meant that the lighthouse keeper had to wind the clockwork system every three hours to keep the lens of the light turning by night. Now the light is automated, but lighthouse keepers are still resident to man the radios and do meteorological readings. Visiting a lighthouse is a nostalgic experience and a taste of a bygone era. South Africa is one of the few countries that still employs lighthouse keepers, so before they are gone for good, consider going to meet one.  

Tel: +27 44 690 3015; open Monday to Friday 10h00 to 12h00 and 12h30 to 17h00.








Taking Back our Human Rights


Each year we celebrate Human Rights Day in honour of all those who fought, struggled and died for the freedom of rights we enjoy today. In South Africa, 21stMarch is the anniversary of the Sharpeville Massacre in 1960. While this is often an emotional day, it is also one to commemorate the positive changes that have taken place globally.

Instead of focusing on the immeasurable human suffering over the years, we take a look at some of the major changes in legislation that liberated different people, genders and cultures around the world.

WOMEN ARE ALLOWED TO VOTE
While it may seem ordinary to many, the right to vote hasn’t always been a given, not only for all races, but also for both genders. In some places around the world women are still harshly discriminated against and denied their basic right to vote. It was only in New Zealand in 1893 that women were first liberated and given a chance to voice their opinions. This was ratified in 1948 when women’s voting rights were introduced into international law when the United Nations (UN) adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY IN AMERICA
From Africa to America, slavery has existed throughout history, in one form or another. People have been captured and, by the cruel crack of a whip, denied their basic right to freedom. They have been coerced into different forms of forced labour by those more powerful than they. On 1st January 1863, Abraham Lincoln, the then president of America, issued the Emancipation Proclamation declaring all slaves within certain states to be free. Slavery in America wasn’t fully abolished until the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution came into effect on 18th December 1865. Other nations around the globe followed suit and passed their own anti-slavery acts. There are, however, many problems that still exist worldwide, including human trafficking, prostitution and forced child labour.

SUPPRESSION OF ABORIGINES IN AUSTRALIA
During the early days of European settlement in Australia, the Aboriginal Protection Act of 1869 was enacted by the government. Aborigines were displaced and persecuted. From marriages to employment, these native Australians’ natural rights were suppressed for many years. Policies were enacted which allowed those in power to send these native inhabitants to reserves or institutions. They were not considered human and could even be killed legally. In an effort to turn Aboriginal children into “useful” citizens, policies were established whereby they could be removed from their parents’ guardianship and forced to convert to common European religions. These children became know as “The Stolen Generation”. The plight of these people continued until the Aboriginal Protection Act was repealed in 1969.

THE END OF APARTHEID IN SOUTH AFRICA
International sanctions affecting the economy, millions of unemployed people and intensifying black resistance were the main contributors to the demise of the Apartheid system in South Africa. The first steps were the un-banning of the ANC and the release of Nelson Mandela from prison in February 1990. Over the next few years, further negotiations between the National Party, under FW De Klerk, and other political parties took place in a forum known as the Convention for a Democratic South Africa (CODESA). The result was the formation of the first constitution of South Africa and the Bill of Rights. It was in 1994, when the ANC won the majority vote in the national elections, that the struggle was finally over. For the first time, black South Africans didn’t need passes to walk in the streets and they didn’t have to endure racial segregation. They didn’t have to live in fear anymore. Democracy in our country had finally become something tangible and it had a face – Nelson Mandela.

South Africa is now one of the few countries worldwide to have a Bill of Rights protecting its people. In recognition of the need to educate the public and protect their rights, the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) was established in 1996. It is an institution that aims to educate the public about their human rights, as well as the responsibilities related to them.

Wars have been fought, lives have been taken and people have been treated inhumanely. This Human Rights’ Day, take a moment to remember how far the world has come. Imagine how much more we can achieve if we stand together against those who deny others their basic human rights? Know your rights and know that you are equally responsible for them.

INTERESTING INFORMATION
·      On 10th December 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
·      10thDecember is International Human Rights Day.
·      South African citizens’ basic human rights weren’t protected until the country became a constitutional democracy in 1994.
·      The Bill of Rights is the foundation of democracy in our country.

POSSIBLE PULL QUOTES
·      “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere . . . Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” Martin Luther King Junior
·       “Human rights are not a privilege conferred by government. They are every human being’s entitlement by virtue of his humanity. The right to life does not depend, and must not be contingent, on the pleasure of anyone else, not even a parent or sovereign.” Mother Theresa
·      The time is always right to do right.” Nelson Mandela










THE WONDER OF THE WRITTEN WORD
18th– 22nd March
Knysna Literary Festival, Knysna
 
The Knysna Literary Festival is the Garden Route’s only literary festival and hosts an exclusive group of hand-selected authors from South Africa and abroad each year. Attendees’ imaginations will take flight with this year’s diverse programme, which touches on current affairs, politics, history and adventure.

From engaging with authors in workshops and presentations, to mingling with literary experts while sipping local wine, the Knysna Literary Festival provides attendees with a unique literary experience. The festival’s goal is to not only expose locals and visitors to South Africa’s literary talent, but also to stimulate the children of the greater Knysna area by encouraging reading and writing, and by contributing to local charities that focus on childhood development and education.

www.knysnaliteraryfestival.co.za







Hermanus on the Southern Cape Coast, which is also called the Overberg, expands to bursting point in the summer months with wall-to-wall people, but some of the other smaller towns are not quite as crowded. Well, only just.
Gansbaai is the centre of the shark cage-diving industry so you could get up close and personal with a Great White. You can also do a wine-tasting tour through some of the most southerly vineyards in the world, visit the southernmost tip of Africa at Cape Agulhas, or explore the huge sea cave at Arniston.

While it is pretty crowded here, you’ll still find some long, lovely beaches to walk on. Close to Cape Agulhas, in the small farming town of Bredasdorp, is South Africa’s only dedicated shipwreck museum, attesting to the challenging waters around Africa’s most southern coast.







North West is on Board


SA Express is proud to announce the introduction of three (3) weekly flights between OR Tambo International Airport and Pilanesberg. In addition, SA Express will be introducing two (2) flights between Pilanesberg and Cape Town. 

This growing regional and domestic airline is confident that adding this route to its already expansive network will ensure the best possible connections for business and leisure customers.

SA Express’ 50-seater CRJ 200 will service this route. The Johannesburg to Pilanesberg route will launch with a frequency of once daily, every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.  The Cape Town to Pilanesberg route will have two flights a day on Mondays and Fridays. These new routes are aligned to the airlines' strategic focus of consolidating its domestic operations and offering improved connectivity into developing domestic hubs.
Flight bookings can be made through travel agents or online  
Flight times
Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Johannesburg to Pilanesberg
Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Pilanesberg to Johannesburg
Monday and Friday: Cape Town to Pilanesberg
Monday and Friday: Pilanesberg to Cape Town

We look forward to having you onboard of SA Express flights

Thank you for your continued support.

Regards

Brian van Wyk
SA Express GM Commercial






The West Coast Way
For those looking for something to do on your next holiday, why not hop in the car and go road-tripping up the West Coast?  From the Blaauwberg Private Nature Reserve and the seaside village of Melkbosstrand, up past the West Coast National Park and winding its way past Shelley Point, St Helena Bay and Velddrif, the Cape West Coast has so much to offer that you may never want to go home again. 


Why not start your road trip with a stop at the Farmyard Farmstall on the R27, situated at the turn-off to Melkbosstrand? Here you can enjoy a delicious and hearty breakfast (road-tripping fuel) while the kids play in the playground, and then fill up your picnic basket with locally made eats and treats that will see you well fed for the rest of your day.

From here you can head towards the Koeberg Private Nature Reserve with its 153 bird species and variety of mammals. Or try the Witzand Aquifer Nature Reserve with its white sand dunes, which are fantastic for 4X4 enthusiasts and sand boarders.

Moving on, be sure to stop in the small town of Mamre to visit the Mission Station, one of the oldest and most picturesque churches in South Africa. Surprisingly, given its religious past, wine has long been a part of Mamre’s history and you can find the region’s popular wines at the Darling Wine Cellar on Mamreweg.

And while on the topic of wine, make sure that your road trip includes a stop at Groote Post Winery, which has recently won a Klink Wild Card Award for their interesting and alternative farm drive experience. This family friendly wine farm also hosts an amazing country market on the last Sunday of every month. Here you can expect to find everything from oysters and wild mushrooms to locally brewed beer from the Darling Brewery.

Your West Coast road trip should also include a visit to the towns of Darling (home of well-known political satirist Pieter-Dirk Uys and his theatre, Evita se Perron); Yzerfontein; Langebaan (an internationally acclaimed Ramsar site); Saldanha,which is a hot spot for water sport lovers; Jacobsbaai (known as the  “Namaqualand by the sea”); Paternosterand the Cape Columbine Reserve; Shelley Point with its golf course and wellness centre; St Helena Bay with its unspoilt coastline and magnificent views; and historic Hopefield with its birdlife and hiking trails.

Along the route you will discover “must visit” attractions such as the West Coast National Park, which stretches from Yzerfontein to Langebaan and is a pristine nature reserve which offers an array of activities such as bird watching, game sighting, biking and whale watching. The !Khwa ttu San Culture and Education Centre offers fascinating insight into the culture, heritage, knowledge and modern day life of the San of Southern Africa, while the West Coast Fossil Park allows a glimpse back in time to the animals and vegetation that were found in the region millions of years ago, with a visit to an actual dig sight.

CAPE WEST COAST BIODIVERSITY CORRIDOR
Most of these attractions fall within the newly proclaimed West Coast Biodiversity Corridor, while others are just a leisurely drive away. The good news for those who are keen to explore the Corridor is that these attractions are included on two new circular sightseeing routes, the Groene Kloof Route and Blue Benguela Route, which have been launched by an exciting new tourism initiative called West Coast Way.

Carmen Lerm, founder of West Coast Way, says that whether your focus is sightseeing, photo opportunities, history, culture, fauna and flora, or adventure and activities, the West Coast and the West Coast Biodiversity Corridor has much to offer.  “It is about the rich experience, the vibrant people, the food and colours you will find here, not to mention the beautiful unspoilt environment and the myriad of attractions and activities that can be enjoyed on the Cape West Coast.”

READ FULL ARTICLE FROM


For more information on West Coast Way, 
visit or call West Coast Way on 0861 321 777. 
Connect with West Coast Way on Facebook and twitter at







 Life is a cabaret

“There was a cabaret, and there was a master of ceremonies, and there was a city called Berlin in a country called Germany. It was the end of the world… and I was dancing with Sally Bowles and we were both fast asleep…”

In five short years, The Fugard Theatre in Cape Town’s Fringe precinct has – on the back of prestigious dramas, magical entertainment, and top-drawer performers – built a solid reputation as a bastion of independent theatre. It is with its musicals, especially, that the robust little theatre has managed to shake up the public’s mindset, and cram its auditorium with sold-out performances and extended runs. 

According to the theatre’s executive director, Daniel Galloway, the recent runaway success of **The Rocky Horror Show** served as a turning point for The Fugard. “What was meant to be an eight week season turned out to be a monster of a production, which by the time it closed for its final season in Johannesburg on 1st February, played for 61 sold-out weeks and was seen by more than 150,000 people.” Despite the show’s high running expenses, full houses meant production and theatre costs were covered, something that is notoriously hard to achieve.

That success no doubt explains why the creative team behind the **Rocky Horror** phenomenon has been assembled once again to drive a new production of another popular musical. Packed with some of theatre’s most beloved songs and most memorable characters, **Cabaret** is being revived at The Fugard this month with **Rocky Horror** director, Matthew Wild, at the helm. Known for his provocative staging and ability to make the audience feel as though they’re part of the action, Wild has used his dapper hand to turn operas into lively romps and has, in a relatively short career, earned a reputation for bringing a new energy and verve to even well-known works. “I try to stage things in a way that will wake people up a bit,” he says. “I like to jolt audiences into seeing a work in a new light. I think audiences go into a bit of a snooze if they get what they expect.”

Even after blowing audiences away with his concept for **Rocky Horror**, Wild has his work cut out for him with his reimagining of **Cabaret**, a show with a 50-year pedigree.

Set in Berlin just as the Nazis came to power in pre-war Weimar Germany, the story weaves together sagas of frail relationships played off against a backdrop of creeping social and racial prejudice. Meanwhile, the decadence and debauchery of Berlin’s nightlife is showcased via risqué performances at the outrageously debauched Kit Kat Klub, where revellers are entertained by the Emcee’s provocative cabaret ensemble. Their hot, sweaty, frequently lascivious song-and-dance routines actually work as powerful commentary on Germany’s darkening mood as a nation falls almost unconsciously into the grip of Nazi control. It’s a tragic parable, really, about the consequences of a society turning a blind eye to what’s happening in the real world around them.

Woven into the cabaret club’s escapist milieu of gaiety and frivolous excess are unfolding human dramas of persecution, primarily of Jews and homosexuals. It’s this social dimension that gives the musical its timeless relevance. More than a sexy, entertaining romp, it’s a metaphor for how stealthily systems of political control can turn sinister and abusive.

Based on a play that was based on a short novel by Christopher Isherwood, the musical made its debut in 1966, becoming a Broadway hit before being made into a hugely successful feature film starring Liza Minnelli as Sally Bowles, and the illustrious Joel Grey as Emcee. The film won eight Oscars, but lost in the Best Picture category to **The Godfather**.

In 1993, the show was reconceived for the West End when Sam Mendes directed it, with Alan Cummings in the role of Emcee – a part he’s recently revived for a Broadway production that comes to an end this month. The Mendes production included a number of changes, giving it a more overtly sexualised tone and borrowing significantly from the film adaptation.

Meanwhile, in Cape Town, Emcee is being played by Charl-Johan Lingenfelder, who returns to the stage for the first time in 20 years. Lingenfelder, who is also the show’s musical supervisor, has worked behind the scenes as musical director for countless productions, including **Rocky Horror**.

Lingenfelder says that it’s an opportunity of a lifetime. “It’s a potent piece of theatre with incredible relevance. And Emcee is one of the greatest characters written for musical theatre. I believe there’s a lot of life still to be breathed into this character, even though everybody knows Joel Grey and Alan Cummings. I’m not interested in replicating what they’ve done. I’m interested in seeing what I can bring to this character.”

It’s a demanding role, and crazily athletic, too, he says. “The only question for me is whether I actually have the stamina to last that long on a stage. I’ve just assumed that I’m capable of doing what I could do 20 years ago.”

Something Lingenfelder does know is that the on-stage world he’ll inhabit will be fully formed and highly engaging. “One of Matthew Wild’s big strengths is his understanding of style and his grasp of an era, and he has the ability to make those elements enticing for a contemporary audience. **Rocky Horror** was a very good example of that. Every little detail was set in a period, but done in such a way that audiences could relate to it. **Cabaret** will work in a similar way, giving audiences a grasp of what the period was like. ”

For some people, that period will come as a shock. Certainly, says Lingenfelder, the debauchery of the era will probably surprise South African audiences. “Few people have any idea of the level of decadence that was happening in Berlin during the Weimar era. Stuff that today is frowned upon was part of that era’s free-for-all and was part of daily life. That is something that will come to life in this production through whatever tools we have at our disposal.”

For Wild, portraying that decadence has nothing to do with creating sensationalism, and everything to do with compelling people to sit up and pay attention. “I don’t intentionally try to shock audiences, but I do want people to actually engage with what’s going on and one way to do that is to give them a staging that’s unexpected. Something that jolts them out of their comfort zone.”

Cabaret’ opened at The Fugard Theatre in Cape Town on 10th March.

Tickets are available from the box office +27 21 461 4554 or computicket.com.






Tuningi Safari Lodge

One of the privileges of living in Africa is being able to share the wonders of the bush and of our extensive wildlife heritage with our children.

However, opportunities to do this are often limited to self-drive options and less than luxurious accommodation, as many private game lodges do not allow children under the age of 12. Not so for Tuningi Safari Lodge, however, which offers all the added touches of being in an exclusive five-star lodge so mum and dad feel special, while also offering fun and innovative ways for children of all ages to engage with the bush.

A fully equipped play area and activity room is designed to keep kids happily entertained for hours, thereby freeing up mum and dad for a cocktail on the deck, a dip in the pool, or an evening game drive. Kids can choose to play on the grass outside or hang out in the tent that is permanently pitched in the grounds, or opt to read, watch DVDs or play games. Every day there are different supervised activities, from T-shirt painting with animal stencils to treasure hunts and playing a game of Memory with found objects like feathers, bones and quills hidden under baskets on the lawn. There’s also a very popular clay animal making competition with kids eager to outdo each with the intricacies of their model game reserves.

However, the best way to truly experience the bush is to actually explore it. Older children may join their parents on early morning or afternoon game drives (behaviour dependent), otherwise littlies, and those kids not able to sit still for a full three hour game drive, are well catered for with shorter, kid-friendly game drives called Bumbles. Led by an experienced game ranger, kids are taken out and taught about the ways of the bush through active participation – they stop to pick up objects like bones and fallen birds’ nests for their discovery box, or hop out to trace paw prints onto transparencies to learn more about the differing sizes of various animals. They can also record the things they learn and the animals they spot in their interactive safari books to show mum and dad when they get back to the lodge.

Mealtimes are also fun with boma dinners (for adults and kiddies), followed my marshmallows around the fire and stories about the stars. Little guests are also invited into the kitchen from time to time to cook with the chef.

When they’re not out and about in the reserve or the lodge, kids and their parents can retreat to the comfort of their suites that come complete with deep baths, fun outdoor showers, decks from which to watch the animals wander by, and comfortable beds draped beautifully in muslin. The two Family Suites also have the added convenience of comprising two double en suite bedrooms, as well as a dining room, kitchenette, and living room.

It’s little wonder that the lodge has a high percentage of return visitors keen to revisit this best-of-both-worlds lodge – a haven for parents and an adventurous escape for kids.

**For more information, email reservations@tuningi.co.za or visit www.tuningi.com.**










The 2015 Tshwane Open takes place from 12 March to 15 March at the beautiful Pretoria Country Club in the leafy suburb of Waterkloof.

This highly anticipated 72-hole stroke play championship will feature a total of 156 international and local professional golfers.

The Tshwane Open forms part of the 2015 Sunshine Tour and is co-sanctioned with the European Tour. The Sunshine Tour represents the highest level of competition for male professional golfers in Southern Africa. The tournament provides players a chance to gain Sunshine Tour Order of Merit points, European Race to Dubai points and sought after world ranking points.

This is the third Tshwane Open tournament, and the first time that it takes place at the historic Pretoria Country Club. This beautiful parkland course, designed by the Gary Player Group, is very different to the previous two tournaments.

Purse

The prize fund stands at R18.5-million.

Venue


The Pretoria Country Club will be the host venue for this prestigious event – a premier course designed by the Gary Player Group. The parklands course ranks in the Top 50 in the country and offers an outing that is both challenging and enjoyable for golfers of all levels.

Address:

Pretoria Country Club
241 Sidney Avenue
Waterkloof

Tickets

  • Tickets cost R50 a day for adults for the first two days of the tournament, Thursday 12 March and Friday 13 March.
  • Tickets cost R100 a day for adults for the last two days of the tournament, Saturday 14 March and Sunday 15 March.
  • Pensioners and children under 16 get in for free.
  • There are also four-day season passes available at a cost of R150 each.
  • Tickets can be booked online from  . You will need to print out the tickets.
  • Tickets can also bought at the gate, on Dely Road, on each day of the tournament.

Gates open at 6am.
For more information visit: 




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ul { list-style-type: none; margin: 0; padding: 0; overflow: hidden; background-color: #333; } li { float: left; } li a { display: block; color: white; text-align: center; padding: 14px 16px; text-decoration: none; } li a:hover:not(.active) { background-color: #111; } .active { background-color: #4CAF50; } DMCA report abuse Home Todas Pastas Auto Post sitemap Blog "Sem Imagens" oLink xxx var ad_idzone = "1877044", ad_width = "728", ad_height = "90"; THE FUTURE FACE OF SA FASHION Tags:#boys, #their, #fashion, #here, #africa, #that, #soweto, #this, #were, #they, #time, Search:boys, their, fashion, here, africa, that, soweto, this, were, they, time, The Boys of SowetoText: Lisa WitepskiImages © SuppliedInternational style icons are a dime a dozen. Blogs like "The Sartorialist" have made wardrobe-peeking a pastime we never tire of, and people like Tavi Gevinson have seen their love of clothes push them right into the fashion front row. But what’s happening here in South Africa? Quite a bit, actually.What might surprise you is that the cradle of South African couture isn’t the glittering emporia of, say Sandton. Rather, style is being birthed on the streets of Soweto, and because of that, it has an urban grittiness that makes it as irresistible as it is eye catching, like a brash girl with an attitude and a killer smile to match.As the founder of the Boys of Soweto movement, Bob Ndima – better known as Bob The Stylist – is one of the pioneers of this trend. Bob epitomises the new-age stylista. His love of fashion isn’t simply about well-made seams and the aesthetic joy of a beautiful outfit. Rather, it’s about using clothing as a form of self-expression and a vehicle for raising consciousness.This makes sense, given how this love story unfolded. “Growing up in Soweto, brands were a big thing,” Ndima explains. He and his crew – Kronic Nhleko, Mbali Bangwayo, Manti Moholo and Steja Kgobane, the eponymous “Boys” – were fascinated by the **amapantsula** (young men in their neighbourhood who took care to look sharp and dapper at all times, in spite of being unemployed). This planted the seed and the boys became obsessed with image, trekking through to Sandton malls on the weekend, where they would pore over the international fashion magazines that weren’t available in the township. From there, the next step was purchasing the brands that were in hot demand, and selling them to their neighbours at a profit.By now, Bob was truly entrenched in the world of fashion, to the extent that he and his group developed their own subculture, **is’bhujwa**. Roughly translated, the name means “bourgeoisie”. Bob says that he’s still unsure if the people who dreamed it up felt that his crew thought they were better than everyone else. Even if that wasn’t the case, Bob himself soon tired of brands and the consumerist culture they encouraged, and he turned to a more authentic style. “At the time, I was heavily influenced by Rastafarianism, which emphasised a more spiritual way of life,” he explains. The accent may have been less on outward appearances, but – ironically – it got Bob thinking about the way Africans perceive themselves and follow international trends, rather than embracing their own identity. “For example, I started wearing an Afro instead of shaving my head like most black guys do, because it’s more natural.”**Is’bujwa** was the birthing place of Boys of Soweto. Years later, Bob, now 30, is still determined to get South Africans to step up to the fashion plate. “That’s what Boys of Soweto is about,” he says, noting that although the crew’s blog – featuring immaculately styled shots of the guys in their not-to-be-ignored threads – is their primary focus, it’s certainly not the only one. The gang have been involved in a number of brand collaborations, and most recently Bob has been asked to give his input in the development of a line of denim wear. He’s also joined forces with local milliner Chanel, with whom he is designing a range of fedoras. Another exciting project sees him designing his own range of suits to complement his T-shirt collection, which has already gained a following overseas – in fact, Bob estimates that most of the garments purchased are by tourists. The beauty of these projects, he says, is that they bring one of the most important challenges facing South African design into the spotlight. “There’s no doubt that we have the talent and the creativity. Where we’re lacking is in our craft – the construction of our garments can’t stand up to international designers, and this is where we need to improve.” Bob hopes that by bringing South African design to more people’s attention, he’ll highlight issues of this nature. In the meantime, Boys of Soweto is slowly expanding beyond shirts and suits. They recently established a book club, and although it currently has a limited membership, he’s keen to see its numbers grow. “The point is to create a platform where we can discuss the issues we face daily,” he says, adding that one of the strengths of the initiative is that, as members of different professions – from law to fashion – they bring together a multitude of reference points. “I was surrounded by so many truly talented people when I was growing up. They were all in different fields – some were soccer players, others were academics – but so few of them flourished. We need to stop that, and that’s what Boys of Soweto is all about, forging the kind of relationships that help us mentor each other through the tough times.”It may sound idealistic, but then Bob is, on the whole, a dreamer. Or, at the very least, an enthusiastic optimist. “It’s a great time to be a creative in Africa. The world is looking to our continent for inspiration. It’s time for us to shine,” he says. LUXURY IN THE HEART OF THE WINELANDS Grande Roche HotelText & Images © Grande Roche HotelLocated a convenient 40-minute drive from the centre of Cape Town is the historic country village of Paarl. Known as the gateway to the Cape Winelands, Paarl is the perfect base from which to explore the best of the Cape countryside. And nestled at the foot of the magnificent Paarl Rock Mountain is the five-star Grande Roche Hotel. This small luxury hotel provides a space for rest and relaxation, where guests can enjoy panoramic views of the Paarl Valley and Drakenstein Mountains as they savour a meal on the terrace or lounge in the opulent interiors before exploring the surrounding winelands.A proud member of the Small Luxury Hotels of the World, Grande Roche Hotel features 28 elegant and comfortable suites situated amongst the vineyards of a working fruit and wine farm – combining historical Cape country living with modern-day comforts.Upon arrival, guests are warmly greeted with a welcome drink and escorted through the beautiful gardens to their rooms. Friendly service is paramount, and each visitor is made to feel instantly at home. The suites reflect the history of the hotel, with each named after a selection of grape and plum varietals found on the estate. Modern conveniences include complementary Wi-Fi, air conditioning, under floor heating and heated towel rails.Heritage and history are the underlying charms of the hotel. Carefully restored buildings trace the passage of time, from the slave bell and the site of the old outdoor oven to the unique setting of the tiny chapel – one of the oldest buildings in South Africa and perfect for intimate wedding ceremonies.A journey of culinary delight awaits diners in the award-winning Bosman’s Restaurant, where the hotel’s Executive Chef Roland Gorgosilich works his magic. Award-winning and Michelin-trained, Gorgosilich infuses classic cuisine with innovative and imaginative twists. His gastronomic delights are enhanced by inspired wine pairings, and a sommelier is on hand to assist with recommendations from the 425 varieties of wines available from the hotel’s private cellar.Other dining options include the relaxed and casual atmosphere of the terrace and the poolside Bistro Allegro, both of which invite informal eating, but can be transformed into elegant al fresco experiences. Value for money, inspired menus and fresh ingredients are hallmarks of the Bistro taste experience.Grande Roche Hotel is situated just a short stroll from the town of Paarl. From this central base, visitors can enjoy a wide number of activities, exploring the valley on foot, by bicycle, on horseback, or from a hot air balloon. There are also wonderful golfing estates in the area. With facilities that accommodate up to 120 delegates, Grande Roche Hotel offers the ideal conference and meeting venue away from the commotion of the city. The hotel’s capable team takes care of all event arrangements.  Grande Roche’s location and ambience offers couples a truly historic and unique setting in which to host an elegant wedding reception. Along with its private chapel and manicured gardens, the hotel boasts a professional functions and events team that will ensure that wedding days are carefree events.All told, the hotel offers a peaceful escape from the hustle of daily life, while delivering on a promise of service excellence in every respect.For further information and bookings call +27 21 863 5100 or visit www.granderoche.com LET THE WINE FLOW THE NEW 2007 SAMSARA SYRAHAvondale, one of the leading proponents of biodynamic winemaking in South Africa, are releasing their new 2007 Samsara Syrah at a particularly propitious time. The name “Samsara” comes from the Sanskrit word meaning “to flow on” through the endless cycle of life, and as the soil recovers from the rigours of the harvest, and prepares – through the winter months – for the rebirth of Spring, it is a fitting time to recognise and celebrate its reincarnation with a new vintage of one of South Africa’s finest and most individual wines. The 2007 Samsara Syrah is an elegant wine which focuses on refined flavours that develop over time. Sixteen different blocks of organic grapes were used, each handled in a way specific to the soil, aspect and age of vines, and the wine was then aged in small French oak barrels for between 12 and 16 months. Samsara 2007 is available from the farm at R335 per bottle. www.avondalewine.co.za AN OUT OF TOWN TIMEOUT Countryside HospitalityText: Nicky FurnissImages © Oaklands Country Manor & De Hoek Country House"While the bright lights of the big city may be enticing for some, even the most fast paced of city dwellers occasionally need a little time out of the rat race to reconnect with nature and soak up a little relaxation, country style. Here are two of our top picks for getting away from it all."Oaklands Country Manor, HarrismithThere is nothing quite like the feeling of achieving something you never thought you would. Like cantering around an arena on a beautiful horse – not walking, mind you, or even trotting, but full on cantering! For an inexperienced rider such as myself, it was a dream come true, and all thanks to a superbly well trained horse and an excellent instructor. The owners and staff of Oaklands live and breathe horses – polo ponies (and a resident pet donkey), to be precise. For almost two decades, Oaklands has been one of South Africa’s premier polo venues, and as a result it offers a very unique type of holiday for those looking to hone their polo skills. Thanks to world-class facilities – including a floodlit polo arena, a polo pit, a wooden horse, and fully equipped classroom – brave guests can opt to learn the sport from scratch, while experienced players have somewhere to go to practise their favourite sport, especially as a number of the staff are always keen to make up numbers for a chukka or two. Those not as adept on a horse – but still equine lovers – can opt instead for a more sedate outride, which is made all the more enjoyable by the dramatic mountain scenery which adds to Oaklands’ magical quality. This is also why mountain biking, hiking, fishing, bird watching and paddling on the dam are equally enticing outdoor pursuits here – when not cheering on the polo players from the sidelines, glass of wine in hand. And when the mist and the rain rolls in – as it is wont to do in this hilly part of the country, at the top of the Van Reenen’s Pass that connects the Free State to KwaZulu-Natal – you can retire to one of the lounges to warm your toes by the fire and your hands on a steaming cup of hot chocolate. You’ll have company too, in the form of a pack of resident Great Danes, but be sure not to steal one of their sofas, as they have laid claim to a fair few! There’s also Dennis, an arthritic little mongrel with a distinctive jerky gait who will very quickly become one of your favourite residents, as he is for a fair number of Oaklands guests, many of whom return year after year. It’s little wonder too, as besides its beautiful setting and horsey attractions, Oaklands really does feel like a home away from home. This is in large part because it is very much a family run establishment, with four siblings – Caroline, Annie, Kathy and Simon – each contributing their own talents to running Oaklands, from hospitality and marketing to cooking up a storm in a kitchen. It is their special brand of relaxed warmth that makes guests feel like they really can put their feet up without any need to stand on occasion – which is a rarity at most hotels. And while you are putting your feet up, you may as well feast, because once you've tasted Kathy's cooking, how could you not? Kathy Romer-Lee is a well known chef with a host of top restaurants and lodges on her CV, and she continues to produce world class cuisine at the family hotel. With a passion for the concept “veld to plate”, Kathy uses only  locally sourced ingredients (as well as growing others herself) to conjure up tummy warming breakfasts, tasty lunches and really hearty, home-style cooked dinners – such as her famous Dargle Valley pork ribeye roast – cooked and plated to five-star perfection. Once you’ve rolled yourself out of the dining room, and had a friendly drink or two at the bar with other guests and the family, a warm fire and a cosy bed await you as you drift off to sleep dreaming of decadent chocolate bomb desserts, horses and Great Danes. For more information, visit www.oaklands.co.za.De Hoek Country House, Magaliesburg“Sanctuary” is a word often bandied about in tourist brochures and on hotel websites, but in the case of De Hoek Country Hotel, it certainly lives up to the term. Situated just an hour from Johannesburg and Pretoria, it feels miles away from the hustle and bustle of city life. As you drive slowly down its tree bedecked driveway or wander through its beautifully landscaped gardens, it’s easy to get lulled into living life – at least for the weekend – at a more sedate pace, more akin to nature’s natural flow. And nature certainly takes centre stage here. The original sandstone Main House is nestled in a lush garden, shaded by mature trees and scented by the fragrance of rose bushes. The more recently added New Quarter Suites offer expansive views of the rolling hills of the Magaliesberg in the distance, while the Superior Suites come complete with the soothing sounds of water from the nearby river which flows through the estate. Activities here also make the most of the hotel’s beautiful surroundings, with archery and croquet on offer in the garden, guided mountain and river walks on the property, as well as cycling trails for mountain bike enthusiasts in the surrounding area. Perhaps the best way to truly experience De Hoek’s picturesque setting is from the air, and what better way to do it than from the basket of a hot air balloon, as it wafts quietly and gently through the air, offering its passengers a bird’s eye view of the patchwork of green below.All of this fresh air is guaranteed to work up an appetite, which is sure to be satiated by De Hoek’s Swiss-trained Master Chef, Michael Holenstein. Guests have a choice of two restaurants onsite. The glass enclosed Bridge Bistro offers pretty views to enjoy while dining on a light menu, while The Conservatory promises some of the best fine dining in the Magaliesberg area, if not in the country. This beautiful, glass fronted dining room catches the early morning light and opens out onto the pond and garden, making for a warm and cosy atmosphere as guests enjoy a hearty breakfast of both delicious continental and cooked options. It truly comes alive in the evenings, though, when soft candlelight sparkles off the glittering silver service and superbly trained wait staff top up your wine, before serving plate after delicious plate of the evening’s five course dinner. With only the best local and international ingredients to work with, Chef Holenstein and his team (which includes a number of chefs who are enrolled in the hotel’s in-house chef’s academy) whip up culinary masterpieces, with sauces and stocks made from scratch, and pastries and bread baked fresh every day. Another highlight of De Hoek’s dining experience is the daily afternoon tea, served in the garden and made up of such delights as traditional scones with jam and cream, finger sandwiches, éclairs and muffins, and even a cake drenched in melted chocolate still warm from the oven. And adding a homely touch are the hotel’s resident dogs, who will pad around looking for the odd dropped crumb and wagging their tails warmly at guests. After a day of soaking up the great outdoors and indulging in the kind of food one wants to photograph and blog about, you can retire to your suite to have a good long soak in your bathtub, and then slip between the percale linen sheets of an expansive king size bed. De Hoek is truly a country sanctuary in every sense of the word. For more information, visit dehoek.com.     BEAUTY OF THE SLANGHOEK WINE VALLEY MOUNTAINS TAKE A HIKEDiscover the beauty of the Slanghoek Wine Valley Mountains while hiking along the Jason’s Hill Hiking Route. Breathtaking scenery, babbling brooks, majestic waterfalls and a host of exciting wildlife creates the ultimate hiking experience. The 6.5 km trail offers exquisite views of the valley, with an abundance of fauna and flora to admire along the route. The trail takes between three and four hours and costs R25 per person. Hikers can depart from the Jason’s Hill Private Cellar between 08h00 and 11h00 (Monday to Friday) or between 10h00 and 11h00 on a Saturday. Hikers are provided with a list of bird species to be found in the area, as well as pictures of the birds to make identification easier, especially for tourists who are not familiar with the wildlife in the area. For more information, email info@jasonshill.co.za. How to Decor - Add Style to Your Home Thinking about decorating your home? Worrying about heavy expenses you'll have to incur to change the look of your home? A lot can be done without spending a huge tank of cash. The web-world has dynamically changed the concept of home decor in India.The internet can give you a lot of valuable tips starting with selecting the right sofa set, getting the right bed for your room, and even coloring your home. To start with, selecting the right choice of paint colors gives your home a personalized look. Soft colors such as white, light blue add a rich look to walls.Not just that, light shades even make rooms look bigger than their actual size. There are a lot of people who love to paint their walls. It sure gives you a sense of pride when people look at it and applaud. But, do people living in metropolitan really have the time to do this now? We all live in an age where sensex fluctuates faster than restarting your computer. So how do we color our lives? Your answer is wall decals.Wall decals are a new and happening mode of wall decoration. With the right use of design and color, you can achieve outstanding results in your home. Decal designs can range into different areas like quotes, nature, kids', celebrities, mythology and everything that can be converted into a design. And the best part is, they are not very expensive and can be changed after few years, it is as simple as re-coloring your home.Once the coloring is done, it's time to identify the right furniture for your living room as it stays with you for years. Home decor items are purchased in India with a thought that the next change will be done only after a couple of years. Hence, it surely needs your attention.Big bulky furniture items are totally out of fashion, what's latest is the trendy, curvy and stylish sleek designed furniture. The home decor online sites have many options that it would easily take you days before concluding. You must leave ample walking space around the house and not keep it cluttered. You wouldn't want to clash into stools and tables as you walk.A Wide range of products and furniture that suit different needs can be met just by clicking on various e-commerce websites. you need to do your homework before selecting them like the Reviews, Shipping price, delivery time and return policy.Road Trip Around the Peloponnese Peninsula The Peloponnese Peninsula is Greece's mythical heartland - round every corner you will rediscover the birthplace or setting of a different myth. The time of the ancient Greeks seems still very much alive - existing not in the past or in the ruins you can visit across the region, but in a sort of parallel dimension that seems ever-present. It is almost possible to believe, as you traverse this land steeped in magic and mystery, to believe that the gods are still whimsically toying with humanity.But it is not just about ancient civilisation and myth, nor simply about the wealth of history to be found here. The varied beauty of the Peloponnese Peninsula also makes it a fantastic road trip destination. Whether the road trip you take is in a motorised vehicle or you take a bicycle and travel under your own steam, the Peloponnese Peninsula is bound to put you under its legendary spell.The site of a millennia of Olympic Games, Olympia, the Homeric palaces of Nestor at Pýlos and Agamemnon at Mycenae and the incredibly well preserved Greek theatres at Epidaurus are just a few of the many ancient Greek sites to explore. Other time periods are also extremely well represented in this region. There are a vast number of castles of varying ages, and a plethora of fresco-filled churches and other historic buildings, far too many to name. You will forge your way from one historic settlement to the next. Be sure to travel off the beaten track to find some true gems, for example the mountain villages of Arcadia or the Máni tower villages. Take a break from the roads to travel through Vouraikós Gorge on the old rack and pinion railway line.But the marks made by humanity on this landscape are just a part of the beautiful whole. It is not for no reason that the central area of the peninsula, Arcadia, has given its name to our perfect model of a classic, rural idyll. The interior is a mountainous region of thick, lush forests creeping up craggy peaks and encroaching on dramatic gorges and valleys, while round the coast you will find a range of beautiful beaches, the most unspoiled and quietly scenic of which are found on the West Coast. Take the time, if you can, to hike into the Loúsios Gorge and the area around the mountain villages of Stemnítsa and Dhimitsána in Arcadia, or explore the harsh and underpopulated landscape of the south-eastern Vatika Peninsula. There are many wonderful walks to take all across the Peloponnese.So, for an epic adventure, why not head to the Peloponnese Peninsula and make some legends of your own? The large and rugged peninsula could take a long time to explore properly. No matter how long you have though, be sure not to stick to the major roads. Take your time to explore lesser-travelled routes and don't be afraid to leave the car or bike behind to properly explore a more remote or mountainous area on foot. Remember, the true Peloponnese Peninsula is found where the majority of tourists are not, so forge your own path, meet locals and see what this area is really all about.Getting Cash for Structured Settlements A structured settlement cash advance is allowed by a local judge as administered by federal law. After approval and written order by the presiding judge, the funding company has up to twenty one days to pay the annuitant. Most advances take anywhere from 1-3 months to execute contingent upon the state and capitalization company involved in the claim. Most setbacks are caused by missing and unresolved documents.Annuity settlements are financial compensations that are a result of a claim. These payments are paid off as monthly installment payments. A structured settlement guarantees a set cash for an arranged period or for a person's life span. These installments are structured to arrange accessible cash that are a long-term income, in balance to losses brought about as an outcome of a misfortune. These payouts make up for any ailment or incapability following from the accident.Structured settlements are expected to present a reasonably adequate compensation to an immobilized individual. There are a number of factors that are taken into thought while calculating these installments. These encompass the extent of disability, intensity of the misfortune and estimated future income of the harmed individual. Though these payments present a steady cash flow, they are not always enough to gratify hospital expenses or sudden money requirements. Many individuals choose to sell their structured settlements or annuities for these reasons.For the most part, individuals exchange their future payments to provide money for direct financial requirements. This is a conventional and useful choice, as selling these does not entail risks of secured assets. For this reason, people sell structured settlements to collect immediate finances. Individuals are likely to sell structured settlements in proportion to their fiscal need. If the monetary obligation is limited, people sell a part of the settlements. The unused payments can be held in reserve to gain fixed installments in agreement with the original plans.People may still prefer to sell their whole structured settlement if the fiscal demand is immense. A number of people sell structured settlements in order to invest in other profitable investments. Selling these installments is a solid and permissible exercise. This is due to listed insurance companies deliver these payouts, making them usable and safe.People that desire to sell their payments always approach a funding corporation. These institutions specialize in the annuity factoring industry. When people do finally sell, the money received in exchange is repeatedly at a discounted fee. Selling rates differ contingent upon a number of factors. These include the makeup of the annuity, tenure, purchasing corporation guidelines and the volume of compensation.Sellers should be aware of exactly what that means to the process and the agreement. Someone who exchanges their payments should consistently ask for nothing below than what the standard will bear. The seller could remind the investor that the better the conditions of the deal, the greater chance the court is to authorize the transaction. This does not mean that these types of "trades" exist outside the boundaries of common supply and demand. All buyers are bounded by the secondary deal costs, and the inherent risk in investing an expected payment. It is accepted that a purchaser pays for something as of now, but needs to wait until some future time to acquire payment. different from a buyer of a car or a house, this transaction is reviewed by a third-party, and is not accepted in court without it representing an actual "win-win" situation. Purchasers are not able to take for granted that judges will accept all deals, just as sellers need not take for granted that all deals to purchase payments are constrained by the legal process.HOEDSPRUIT’S SAFARI GEMS BUSH ON A BUDGETTEXT: JUSTIN FOX IMAGES © SUPPLIEDThese days, top-end private lodges in the Kruger Park region are charging in excess of R14,000 per person per night. It’s not easy to find a luxurious, private Big Five experience in the Lowveld that’s still affordable, but Justin Fox manages to sniff out four good options a stone’s throw from Hoedspruit.My SA Express flight, direct from Cape Town, landed at Hoedspruit’s Eastgate Airport and I stepped off the plane into a duvet of early summer heat. The first rains had fallen and everywhere the bush showed green flushes. It was a time of thunderhead skies, cloud-wracked sunsets and leafy iridescence, a time of new life with the first foals, cubs and calves gambolling out in the open. In other words, the perfect time to hit the bush.NTHAMBO TREE CAMPThis pretty lodge is located in Klaserie Private Nature Reserve, which shares unfenced borders with the Kruger National Park and Timbavati Game Reserve. The camp is small and intimate, sleeping a maximum of ten guests in five tented and thatched chalets raised on wooden stilts. There’s a lounge and dining area under thatch which offer great views of a plain with a waterhole in front of the camp, as well as the Drakensberg etched on the western horizon.The game drives at nThambo were most rewarding. There were mud-splattered rhinos up close, two gorgeous lionesses with fluff-ball cubs, and an elephant herd protecting a newborn that insisted on charging our vehicle, but gave up when it received no support from the spoilsport big’uns. Best of all was a graceful serval on the hunt, slinking through the long grass and occasionally standing on its hind legs to peer at prospective prey. She was all sinuous, feline grace. The birdlife was also good: a Saddle-billed stork fracking the mud for tasties amidst a bevy of cacophonic Egyptian geese (the worst named birds in the world, confided our field guide, as they’re apparently Indian ducks). There was a dead Leadwood tree thronged with Grey herons, Spoonbills and Yellow-billed storks, like feathered Christmas decorations. The first of the summer migrants, such as the Woodland kingfisher and European bee-eater, had just arrived and were showing off their gorgeous livery. AFRICA ON FOOTAs the name suggests, this rustic bush camp in Klaserie specialises in walking trails. The lodge has five traditional rondavels, two of which are for families. There’s a small garden (frequented by hippos at night) and a splash pool. A favourite among guests is a tree house which offers the opportunity of spending a night under the stars on a platform high in the branches of a false Marula tree.Our guide, Patrick Leyden, led us repeatedly to a pair of lionesses that were overdue for a hunt. One morning he skidded into camp and ordered everyone onto the vehicle: The girls had just taken down a warthog. We drew up beside the kill. The hog’s flesh looked unnaturally scarlet and the cats’ faces and paws were painted in blood. There was the rasping of tongue on hide, the sawing of heavy breathing, the crunch of cartilage and the snap of sinew. Despite the gore, it was mesmering.The daily walks were first rate. More often than not, we were on our haunches looking at tracks: the clover leaf of hippos, square marks for warthogs, dog-like hyena prints, and the big hoof spoor of giraffe. Patrick pointed out interesting trees and plants, describing their many uses. The magic Gwarrie is a good fire beater and toothbrush. Just snap off a branch, peal away some bark and add paste to the bristles. The best bush toothpaste is the ash of a leadwood mixed with water, explained Patrick, running the Gwarrie over his teeth. NDZUTI SAFARI CAMPThis lodge lies in central Klaserie and offers an intimate safari experience with a focus on one-on-one hospitality. Run by Bruce and Judy Meeser, this is a traditional, colonial-style setup in a large thatched house with only four en suite, air-conditioned guestrooms. For hot summer days there’s a lovely swimming pool and a well wooded garden of tall Baobab, Knob thorn and Fever trees. It’s easy to while away the heat of the day on a poolside lounger listening to the insistent Morse code of woodpeckers, the squawking of go-away birds and the shrill squirrels that come to plunder Judy’s rusks. Meals on the deck beside the pool offer views of a well-trafficked waterhole and we were treated to large elephant herds bathing, slurping and jousting.Up early, our open 4x4 traversed quartzite hills and the verdant banks of a great oxbow sweep of the Klaserie River, accompanied by the sounds of the glug-glug of Green-spotted doves, the rusty hinges of Spurfowl and the trill of laughing doves. Klipspringers and waterbuck guarded the high ground, an elephant polished off a tall salad in the riverbed and a gorgeous reed frog wearing striped pyjamas made an appearance at the breakfast picnic. Sometimes it’s not a member of the Big Five that makes your day.Nokana Safari CampNokana lies northwest of Hoedspruit in the Blyde-Olifants Conservancy in rolling country dotted with granite koppies. This lodge offers a different experience in that it takes guests on daily tours of the surrounding private game reserves and the Kruger Park itself. This means that safaris cover a large area of diverse habitats and wildlife. Apart from game drives, there are bush walks, close encounters with habituated animals, a visit to white lions, and even a boat cruise on the Olifants River. The lodge itself comprises safari-style tents and thatched chalets in a reserve free of dangerous game. Thus mammals such as zebras, wildebeest and warthogs wander through camp at all hours of the day. Horses are kept on the property and pay daily visits, especially at meal times, which can make for some hilarious scuffles over the muesli.A full, seven-day itinerary encompasses all that Nokana has to offer, but a shortened three to four day stay will still give you a pretty diverse taste. The owner and manager, Michel Laforet, is a colourful Frenchman who does everything from guiding to cooking, and even playing the piano.<SIDEBAR> FAST FACTS How to get there: SA Express flies direct to Hoedspruit daily from Johannesburg and every day except Saturday from Cape Town. Visit www.flyexpress.aero to book.What it costs: nThambo Tree Camp has a full-board rate of R2,650 per person, per night sharing. At Africa on Foot it’s R2,195, while nDzuti costs R2,150 and Nokana R2,700. These rates include all game activities, but exclude alcoholic drinks and transfers.How to book: Contact Sun Destinations on +27 21 421 8433, email reservations@sundestinations.co.za or visit www.sundestinations.co.za.WHERE TO MUNCH IN THE MOTHER CITY CHEFS ON CAPE TOWNText: Keith Bain Images © SuppliedTaste of Cape Town returns to the Mother City this month (10th to 12th April), so we asked seven local chefs what makes their restaurants tick, and where we can sink our teeth into a decent meal. THE FARM-TO-TABLE ENTHUSIAST: BRUCE VON PRESSENTIN**Bruce Von Pressentin is head chef at Longridge Restaurant (www.longridge.co.za), on a wine estate which prides itself on its organic vegetable garden.**“We do unpretentious fine-dining and we aim to be organic by incorporating our edible garden as much as possible, growing our own vegetables and herbs, and even some fruit. The garden isn’t just about aesthetics – it makes us more sustainable, and adds freshness to the food."I’m a big fan of George Jardine, the award-winning chef at Jordan (www.jordanwines.com). His food is all about the freshness and quality of the ingredients, as well as using simple combinations to create masterful flavours. Babel (babylonstoren.com) is the groundbreaker in the farm-to-table movement. Our gardeners learnt from the fruit and vegetable garden there. They do incredible salad combinations, based on colours, and their sourcing of meat is also impeccable. Directly across from us is Sweetwell Farm (www.sweetwell.co.za), where I source our pork which they rear with care on their farm. They also have a lovely restaurant with garden-grown vegetables.”                                 THE HIPSTER-MAGNET: LYNDALL MAUNDER**On Bree Street, tattooed lady chef Lyndall Maunder heads up Clarke’s Bar & Dining Room (www.clarkesdining.co.za), which takes hipster heaven to the next level. Known for its hangover-blitzing breakfasts, Clarke’s is about seriously tasty food with the vibe of a neighbourhood local, but bang in the centre of the city.**“We’re essentially an American diner made good. America is like the whole world of food, but a bastard version. I don’t like junk food, but burgers and fried chicken can be done properly, and I’d like to think we get that right here. We do a much-loved ‘All Day Breakfast’ menu, and at night we serve hard liquor, so there’s a permanent buzz."For flavoursome food and good atmosphere, Dias Tavern (+27 21 465 7547) is an eternal favourite with real Portuguese food and a boisterous crowd. In Tamboerskloof, Hallelujah (www.hallelujahhallelujah.co.za) is owned by Adam Whiteman, who has a flawless eye for detail. The style of food – experimental Asian – is pretty much everything I love in a nutshell, plus they serve craft beers and Cape bubbly. "Something really special is Oep ve Koep (+27 22 752 2105) in Paternoster – the chef experiments with foraged ingredients, including things you’ve never heard of. Lots of wild, raw stuff from the shoreline, and true farm produce.”THE COMFORT FOOD ENTHUSIAST: NATASHA WRAY**Natasha Wray is head chef at 96 Winery Road (www.96wineryroad.co.za), a Winelands stalwart with unfussy, delicious food alongside a formidable selection of wines.**“We’re a home-from-home place where you chill with friends and family and hopefully feel utterly relaxed. We do comfort food. Real food. Nothing fancy, but super-yummy, we hope. Ingredients inspire us, and we use what’s local and in season. Some long-serving favourites include our succulent 96 Beef Burger (topped with brie and sautéed black mushrooms), and our dry-aged steaks."I’m a mom, so my two youngsters determine where we eat out, but we are spoilt for choice in the Winelands. A favourite is The Millhouse Kitchen at Lourensford (www.lourensford.co.za) with its local neighbourhood vibe and scrumptious wood-fired pizzas, pork belly, and springbok loin. Mont Marie (www.montmarie.co.za) is super-casual and does special options for children. At Vergelegen, there’s Stables (www.vergelegen.co.za), a super contemporary bistro.”To read more from this article Click link: IndweApril CITY SIGHTSEEING JOHANNESBURG EVEN MORE OF JOBURGCity Sightseeing Johannesburg, the company that operates the iconic red double decker, open top bus tours through the streets of Joburg, has recently partnered with dynamic entrepreneur Bheki Dube, dubbed Maboneng’s “Minister of Tourism”, to add an exciting new extension to their existing Red City Tour that offers sightseers a personal tour of Maboneng’s hot spots. Maboneng means “Place of Light” and is a privately developed urban neighbourhood with a thriving community. It is home to artists, restaurants and coffee shops, cinemas, a community park and residential apartments. Tour goers will now be able to connect to this vibrant area by hopping onto the shuttle at the City Sightseeing Carlton Centre Stop. Visitors will then be delivered to the departure point for the Discover Maboneng Walking Tour. Each day this walking tour has a different focus – Thursday’s offering is an architectural tour, Friday’s tour visits hidden gems and Saturday offers a public art walk. www.citysightseeing.co.za/joburgFrom the CEO's Office april ceo messageFreedoms of the African Skies This April is important for SA Express as we will be celebrating our 21st year of existence and of offering consistently safe travel. April is also the start of the financial year, and we are determined as ever that this new 2015-’16 financial year is one of performance, reliability and continued safe operations. We begin this month on a positive note as we go full steam ahead with our “trajectory for growth” plan for all SA Express staff. SA Express continues to receive Government’s support, and its confidence in the role that the airline plays in ensuring seamless connectivity to secondary markets is key, in addition to the role we fulfil as a catalyst in growing rural tourism. Key partnerships include various top tier lodges in the Hoedspruit area near the Kruger National Park. Our Johannesburg to Hoedspruit and Cape Town to Hoedspruit operations have positively contributed to occupancy rates in the area. The airline will continue to seek such mutually beneficial relationships with partners throughout South Africa and the region. In the new financial year, we are proceeding cautiously and responsibly with our growth ambitions. Key to our success is you – your flying experience and safety are our key priority. We will spare no effort to make your experience as pleasant and memorable as possible. We are continuously reviewing our current network and adding new routes where there is demand. We aim to improve efficiency measures to enable us to provide continued service excellence to you, our customers. With effect in April 2015, we are launching new routes and will begin flying to Pilanesberg and Mafikeng airports. SA Express will operate three weekly flights between OR Tambo International Airport and Pilanesberg and Mafikeng airports respectively. In addition, we will simultaneously be launching two flights between Pilanesberg and Cape Town. This is indeed a significant milestone for us as an airline. These linkages between secondary markets and the three main hubs of Johannesburg, Durban, and Cape Town are aligned with our strategy of making air travel accessible to as many South Africans as possible. These new routes are an integral part of our growth strategy. To the North West Province: “le amogetswe”, which in Setswana means, “welcome”. April has deep historical significance for South Africa, as it also marks 21 years of democracy. We can reflect on the importance of our Constitution and Bill of Rights, and the institutions and freedoms that come from these founding documents. Our children are growing up in an environment where Apartheid is increasingly becoming a distant memory thanks to the many transformative measures that are being implemented by our Government. We need to teach our children to value and cherish these gains. And, as parents, we need to jealously guard these important achievements and do all we can to ensure that our country never slides back to its painful past. April also brings along with it various holidays, such as Easter, which is a Christian holiday that brings families together to celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. This is also a time where schools take a two to three week break, which often leaves children at a loss of what to do with themselves. SA Express can help to take you and your children to exciting family orientated holidays on any of our national and regional flight destinations. We pride ourselves on giving you a unique experience on board our flights with a variety of meals or snacks on all flights. You can expect a comfortable, quality air travel experience, with the added benefits of frequency and excellence as we consistently strive to provide you with the best service. Make sure you book your flights to your favourite Easter holiday destinations with us either by calling reservations on +27 11 978 1111 or going online to www.flyexpress.aero. Interesting April trivia: April starts on the same day of the week as July in all years, and January in leap years. April also ends on the same day of the week as December every year. Make sure you follow SA Express on our various social media platforms to find out about what’s happening in the company and to see all of our specials and promotions in the month of April. Sincerely, Inati Ntshanga Hot Off the Press: Indwe April Issue INDWE Magazine April IssueDownload the April issue from www.issuu.com/tjtmediaThese days, top-end private lodges in the Kruger Park region are charging in excess of R14, 000.00 per person per night. It’s not easy to find a luxurious, private Big Five experience in the Lowveld that’s still affordable, but Justin Fox manages to sniff out four good options a stone’s throw from Hoedspruit.Also in this issue:Regulars: - Bits and Pieces - Bites - EventsCountryside HospitalityOld Four Legs2015's Biggest Wellbeing Trends  FLY-IN SPECIALS: KAPAMA GAME RESERVE Fly-in specials from R 7999 for two nights including flights Valid until 30 June 2015 These rates include: Return Flights from ORTIA on SA Express to HoedspuitTransfers to and from any the Kapama lodgesTwo nights stay at the Kapama Lodge of choice as per our normal terms and conditions listed on the rates page For more information visit www.kapama.co.zaTHE TIP OF AFRICA   Agulhas National Park Get closer to nature while being within easy reach of Cape Town at the Agulhas National Park. Situated just 230 km from Cape Town is the southernmost tip of Africa. The official meeting place of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, it is a place of rugged beauty with rich cultural and natural heritage. Many national monuments can be found in the area, such as the historic Cape Agulhas Lighthouse, which has been in operation since 1849. Agulhas National Park is one of the five national parks in the Cape Region. The park offers accommodation for between two to ten sleepers.THINGS TO DO AT AGULHAS·      Visit the second oldest lighthouse in South Africa, and climb the 71 steps up the lighthouse to enjoy the view of Agulhas from the top.·      Visit the monument marking the location where the Atlantic and Indian Oceans meet at the Southernmost tip of Africa.   ·      Lace up your boots and head out on the hiking trail that runs alongside the ocean and through beautiful tracts of indigenous fynbos.·      Swim in the lagoon at the Rest Camp and enjoy its incredible sea views.·      Check out the shipwrecks that dot the coastline.·      Spend the night in one of the beautifully positioned chalets or in a restored 18th century farm cottage. For more information, contact: +27 28 435 6078, email agulhasinfo@sanparks.org, or visit www.sanparks.org/parks/agulhas or www.sanparks.mobi/parks/agulhas.Coordinates: S 34 49’58”E20 00’ 12”INDWE EVENTS: DRUMBEAT Feel the Beat28thMarch 2015, Soweto Theatre    The music concert **Drumbeat** will feature 13 proudly South African acts, and will set three stages ablaze with jazz, hip-hop, house and pop music. The latest names to be added to the list of performers include Planet Lindela, Afro’traction, Blaklez, DJ Kenzhero and Jonas Gwangwa. Jazz pianist Paul Hanmer, Soweto locals BCUC (Bantu Continua Uhuru Consciousness), AKA, Mi Casa, Toya Delazy and Max-Hoba will also form part of this packed line-up.   The organisers expect more than 5,000 people to attend, so you are encouraged to purchase your tickets early to avoid disappointment. Tickets cost R180 at the door (if available) or R160 from Computicket. www.drumbeatconcert.co.zaDAY TRIPS FROM GEORGE  In and Around Without going too far, there’s plenty to see and do around George, no matter what your specific quirk or interest. From treetops to subterranean caves, lighthouses, rail rides and more, here are seven of the best ways to spend a day out of George. PLAYING TARZAN AND JANEFor children of all ages, Wilderness Nature Reserve has the ultimate tree swinging experience. With 74 aerial platforms linked by bridges, rope swings and zip lines, this is an adrenaline pumping experience for the whole family. There’s also a new zip line that’s over 200 m long and that allows you to fly through the trees over the Timberlake organic village, just like Tarzan would. No matter what your age or stage of adventure, there are tree swinging courses for everyone, as long as you have a sense of adventure and a strong heart.Tel: +27 78 251 4458, Web: www.acrobranch.co.zaGOING UNDERGROUNDThe Cango Caves are Africa’s only show caves, and they are vast. They are located just 90 km from George, near Oudtshoorn, and are open daily (except for Christmas Day). On offer is an underground wonder world of stalagmites and stalactites that have created fantastical limestone sculptures in the cave system. With names like the Drum Chamber, the Bridal and Fairyland chambers, and the Rainbow Chamber, you can’t help but be enchanted by this otherworldly experience where the temperature remains a constant and humid 18°C. Tel: +27 44 272 7410, Web: www.cango-caves.co.zaOLD WORLD CART RIDESJust a few kilometres inland from Klein Brak, at Ruiterbos, is Outeniqua Moon. It’s a unique Percheron stud and guest farm owned by people who have an unbridled passion for these magnificent heavy draft horses. There are 16 Percherons on the farm and guests can go on morning cart rides around the area, drawn by Percherons of course. It is a fabulous day trip out in the country, and Outeniqua Moon also serves delicious lunches. If you visit, you are guaranteed to be captivated by these magnificent horses that are rarer than rhinos.Tel: +27 82 564 9782, Web: www.outeniquamoon.co.zaGOING TO GOLFGeorge is golf central. So if this is your game, you will have landed in Nirvana. Most famous is the Gary Player designed Fancourt, and there is also Ernie Els’s Oubaai as a start. Add to this Kingswood, George Golf Course, Goose Valley and Lagoon Bay, and golfers are spoiled for choice. Move a little further from George on a day trip to Pinnacle Point and Mossel Bay Golf Club or to Pezula, Simola and Knysna Golf Club in Knysna, as well as Plettenberg Bay Golf Club. That’s surely a long enough list to keep the keenest golfer occupied for a very long time.Web: www.where2golf.com/south-africa/george-golf.aspPOWER IN A VANIt’s a unique rail and eco experience unlike any other. The Outeniqua Powervan is a bright red rail carriage that takes up to 20 guests at a time on rail trips into the mountains surrounding George. Not only is the rail experience unusual, but being able to stop in the countryside to enjoy the majestic mountain views and the fauna and flora makes for an invigorating day trip out of town. The Powervan has been operating since 1999 and follows strict safety and rail regulations, so gather friends, pack a picnic, and head for the hills.Tel: +27 44 801 8239, Web: www.georgetourism.org.zaHOOF IT ALONG A HORSE TRAILIf you love the outdoors in the cool, calm, on-the-back-of-a-horse way, then meandering the foothills of the Outeniqua Mountains may be the ideal way to spend a leisurely day. En route you and your charge can cool off in mountain streams if the day heats up, and at the end of your ride you will be served light snacks and refreshments to replenish your energy. Riders are also welcome at Bozzola Equestria, just inland from the town of Little Brak.Tel: +27 44 696 6882 or +27 72 895 9408, Web: www.ruiterbos.comVISIT CAPE ST BLAIZECape St Blaize has been shining since 1864. It is an elegant, white lighthouse in the Victorian style that until the 1970s worked on a windup mechanism. This meant that the lighthouse keeper had to wind the clockwork system every three hours to keep the lens of the light turning by night. Now the light is automated, but lighthouse keepers are still resident to man the radios and do meteorological readings. Visiting a lighthouse is a nostalgic experience and a taste of a bygone era. South Africa is one of the few countries that still employs lighthouse keepers, so before they are gone for good, consider going to meet one.  Tel: +27 44 690 3015; open Monday to Friday 10h00 to 12h00 and 12h30 to 17h00.THE GLOBAL LONG WALK TO FREEDOM Taking Back our Human RightsEach year we celebrate Human Rights Day in honour of all those who fought, struggled and died for the freedom of rights we enjoy today. In South Africa, 21stMarch is the anniversary of the Sharpeville Massacre in 1960. While this is often an emotional day, it is also one to commemorate the positive changes that have taken place globally. Instead of focusing on the immeasurable human suffering over the years, we take a look at some of the major changes in legislation that liberated different people, genders and cultures around the world. WOMEN ARE ALLOWED TO VOTEWhile it may seem ordinary to many, the right to vote hasn’t always been a given, not only for all races, but also for both genders. In some places around the world women are still harshly discriminated against and denied their basic right to vote. It was only in New Zealand in 1893 that women were first liberated and given a chance to voice their opinions. This was ratified in 1948 when women’s voting rights were introduced into international law when the United Nations (UN) adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY IN AMERICAFrom Africa to America, slavery has existed throughout history, in one form or another. People have been captured and, by the cruel crack of a whip, denied their basic right to freedom. They have been coerced into different forms of forced labour by those more powerful than they. On 1st January 1863, Abraham Lincoln, the then president of America, issued the Emancipation Proclamation declaring all slaves within certain states to be free. Slavery in America wasn’t fully abolished until the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution came into effect on 18th December 1865. Other nations around the globe followed suit and passed their own anti-slavery acts. There are, however, many problems that still exist worldwide, including human trafficking, prostitution and forced child labour.SUPPRESSION OF ABORIGINES IN AUSTRALIADuring the early days of European settlement in Australia, the Aboriginal Protection Act of 1869 was enacted by the government. Aborigines were displaced and persecuted. From marriages to employment, these native Australians’ natural rights were suppressed for many years. Policies were enacted which allowed those in power to send these native inhabitants to reserves or institutions. They were not considered human and could even be killed legally. In an effort to turn Aboriginal children into “useful” citizens, policies were established whereby they could be removed from their parents’ guardianship and forced to convert to common European religions. These children became know as “The Stolen Generation”. The plight of these people continued until the Aboriginal Protection Act was repealed in 1969.THE END OF APARTHEID IN SOUTH AFRICAInternational sanctions affecting the economy, millions of unemployed people and intensifying black resistance were the main contributors to the demise of the Apartheid system in South Africa. The first steps were the un-banning of the ANC and the release of Nelson Mandela from prison in February 1990. Over the next few years, further negotiations between the National Party, under FW De Klerk, and other political parties took place in a forum known as the Convention for a Democratic South Africa (CODESA). The result was the formation of the first constitution of South Africa and the Bill of Rights. It was in 1994, when the ANC won the majority vote in the national elections, that the struggle was finally over. For the first time, black South Africans didn’t need passes to walk in the streets and they didn’t have to endure racial segregation. They didn’t have to live in fear anymore. Democracy in our country had finally become something tangible and it had a face – Nelson Mandela. South Africa is now one of the few countries worldwide to have a Bill of Rights protecting its people. In recognition of the need to educate the public and protect their rights, the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) was established in 1996. It is an institution that aims to educate the public about their human rights, as well as the responsibilities related to them. Wars have been fought, lives have been taken and people have been treated inhumanely. This Human Rights’ Day, take a moment to remember how far the world has come. Imagine how much more we can achieve if we stand together against those who deny others their basic human rights? Know your rights and know that you are equally responsible for them.INTERESTING INFORMATION·      On 10th December 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.·      10thDecember is International Human Rights Day.·      South African citizens’ basic human rights weren’t protected until the country became a constitutional democracy in 1994.·      The Bill of Rights is the foundation of democracy in our country. POSSIBLE PULL QUOTES·      “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere . . . Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” Martin Luther King Junior·       “Human rights are not a privilege conferred by government. They are every human being’s entitlement by virtue of his humanity. The right to life does not depend, and must not be contingent, on the pleasure of anyone else, not even a parent or sovereign.” Mother Theresa·      “The time is always right to do right.” Nelson MandelaTHE KNYSNA LITERARY FESTIVAL THE WONDER OF THE WRITTEN WORD18th– 22nd MarchKnysna Literary Festival, Knysna  The Knysna Literary Festival is the Garden Route’s only literary festival and hosts an exclusive group of hand-selected authors from South Africa and abroad each year. Attendees’ imaginations will take flight with this year’s diverse programme, which touches on current affairs, politics, history and adventure. From engaging with authors in workshops and presentations, to mingling with literary experts while sipping local wine, the Knysna Literary Festival provides attendees with a unique literary experience. The festival’s goal is to not only expose locals and visitors to South Africa’s literary talent, but also to stimulate the children of the greater Knysna area by encouraging reading and writing, and by contributing to local charities that focus on childhood development and education. www.knysnaliteraryfestival.co.za SA BEACHES: SOUTHERN CAPE Hermanus on the Southern Cape Coast, which is also called the Overberg, expands to bursting point in the summer months with wall-to-wall people, but some of the other smaller towns are not quite as crowded. Well, only just.Gansbaai is the centre of the shark cage-diving industry so you could get up close and personal with a Great White. You can also do a wine-tasting tour through some of the most southerly vineyards in the world, visit the southernmost tip of Africa at Cape Agulhas, or explore the huge sea cave at Arniston.While it is pretty crowded here, you’ll still find some long, lovely beaches to walk on. Close to Cape Agulhas, in the small farming town of Bredasdorp, is South Africa’s only dedicated shipwreck museum, attesting to the challenging waters around Africa’s most southern coast.SAEXPRESS LAUNCHES PILANSBERG SERVICES North West is on BoardSA Express is proud to announce the introduction of three (3) weekly flights between OR Tambo International Airport and Pilanesberg. In addition, SA Express will be introducing two (2) flights between Pilanesberg and Cape Town. This growing regional and domestic airline is confident that adding this route to its already expansive network will ensure the best possible connections for business and leisure customers.SA Express’ 50-seater CRJ 200 will service this route. The Johannesburg to Pilanesberg route will launch with a frequency of once daily, every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.  The Cape Town to Pilanesberg route will have two flights a day on Mondays and Fridays. These new routes are aligned to the airlines' strategic focus of consolidating its domestic operations and offering improved connectivity into developing domestic hubs. Flight bookings can be made through travel agents or online www.flyexpress.aero  Flight times Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Johannesburg to PilanesbergMonday, Wednesday and Friday: Pilanesberg to JohannesburgMonday and Friday: Cape Town to PilanesbergMonday and Friday: Pilanesberg to Cape Town We look forward to having you onboard of SA Express flightsThank you for your continued support.RegardsBrian van WykSA Express GM CommercialTHE CAPE COAST IS CALLING The West Coast WayFor those looking for something to do on your next holiday, why not hop in the car and go road-tripping up the West Coast?  From the Blaauwberg Private Nature Reserve and the seaside village of Melkbosstrand, up past the West Coast National Park and winding its way past Shelley Point, St Helena Bay and Velddrif, the Cape West Coast has so much to offer that you may never want to go home again. Why not start your road trip with a stop at the Farmyard Farmstall on the R27, situated at the turn-off to Melkbosstrand? Here you can enjoy a delicious and hearty breakfast (road-tripping fuel) while the kids play in the playground, and then fill up your picnic basket with locally made eats and treats that will see you well fed for the rest of your day.From here you can head towards the Koeberg Private Nature Reserve with its 153 bird species and variety of mammals. Or try the Witzand Aquifer Nature Reserve with its white sand dunes, which are fantastic for 4X4 enthusiasts and sand boarders.Moving on, be sure to stop in the small town of Mamre to visit the Mission Station, one of the oldest and most picturesque churches in South Africa. Surprisingly, given its religious past, wine has long been a part of Mamre’s history and you can find the region’s popular wines at the Darling Wine Cellar on Mamreweg.And while on the topic of wine, make sure that your road trip includes a stop at Groote Post Winery, which has recently won a Klink Wild Card Award for their interesting and alternative farm drive experience. This family friendly wine farm also hosts an amazing country market on the last Sunday of every month. Here you can expect to find everything from oysters and wild mushrooms to locally brewed beer from the Darling Brewery.Your West Coast road trip should also include a visit to the towns of Darling (home of well-known political satirist Pieter-Dirk Uys and his theatre, Evita se Perron); Yzerfontein; Langebaan (an internationally acclaimed Ramsar site); Saldanha,which is a hot spot for water sport lovers; Jacobsbaai (known as the  “Namaqualand by the sea”); Paternosterand the Cape Columbine Reserve; Shelley Point with its golf course and wellness centre; St Helena Bay with its unspoilt coastline and magnificent views; and historic Hopefield with its birdlife and hiking trails.Along the route you will discover “must visit” attractions such as the West Coast National Park, which stretches from Yzerfontein to Langebaan and is a pristine nature reserve which offers an array of activities such as bird watching, game sighting, biking and whale watching. The !Khwa ttu San Culture and Education Centre offers fascinating insight into the culture, heritage, knowledge and modern day life of the San of Southern Africa, while the West Coast Fossil Park allows a glimpse back in time to the animals and vegetation that were found in the region millions of years ago, with a visit to an actual dig sight.CAPE WEST COAST BIODIVERSITY CORRIDORMost of these attractions fall within the newly proclaimed West Coast Biodiversity Corridor, while others are just a leisurely drive away. The good news for those who are keen to explore the Corridor is that these attractions are included on two new circular sightseeing routes, the Groene Kloof Route and Blue Benguela Route, which have been launched by an exciting new tourism initiative called West Coast Way.Carmen Lerm, founder of West Coast Way, says that whether your focus is sightseeing, photo opportunities, history, culture, fauna and flora, or adventure and activities, the West Coast and the West Coast Biodiversity Corridor has much to offer.  “It is about the rich experience, the vibrant people, the food and colours you will find here, not to mention the beautiful unspoilt environment and the myriad of attractions and activities that can be enjoyed on the Cape West Coast.”READ FULL ARTICLE FROM Indwe March IssueFor more information on West Coast Way, visit www.westcoastway.co.zaor call West Coast Way on 0861 321 777. Connect with West Coast Way on Facebook and twitter at @WestCoastWaySACABARET: The Fugard Theatre,  Life is a cabaret“There was a cabaret, and there was a master of ceremonies, and there was a city called Berlin in a country called Germany. It was the end of the world… and I was dancing with Sally Bowles and we were both fast asleep…”In five short years, The Fugard Theatre in Cape Town’s Fringe precinct has – on the back of prestigious dramas, magical entertainment, and top-drawer performers – built a solid reputation as a bastion of independent theatre. It is with its musicals, especially, that the robust little theatre has managed to shake up the public’s mindset, and cram its auditorium with sold-out performances and extended runs. According to the theatre’s executive director, Daniel Galloway, the recent runaway success of **The Rocky Horror Show** served as a turning point for The Fugard. “What was meant to be an eight week season turned out to be a monster of a production, which by the time it closed for its final season in Johannesburg on 1st February, played for 61 sold-out weeks and was seen by more than 150,000 people.” Despite the show’s high running expenses, full houses meant production and theatre costs were covered, something that is notoriously hard to achieve.That success no doubt explains why the creative team behind the **Rocky Horror** phenomenon has been assembled once again to drive a new production of another popular musical. Packed with some of theatre’s most beloved songs and most memorable characters, **Cabaret** is being revived at The Fugard this month with **Rocky Horror** director, Matthew Wild, at the helm. Known for his provocative staging and ability to make the audience feel as though they’re part of the action, Wild has used his dapper hand to turn operas into lively romps and has, in a relatively short career, earned a reputation for bringing a new energy and verve to even well-known works. “I try to stage things in a way that will wake people up a bit,” he says. “I like to jolt audiences into seeing a work in a new light. I think audiences go into a bit of a snooze if they get what they expect.”Even after blowing audiences away with his concept for **Rocky Horror**, Wild has his work cut out for him with his reimagining of **Cabaret**, a show with a 50-year pedigree. Set in Berlin just as the Nazis came to power in pre-war Weimar Germany, the story weaves together sagas of frail relationships played off against a backdrop of creeping social and racial prejudice. Meanwhile, the decadence and debauchery of Berlin’s nightlife is showcased via risqué performances at the outrageously debauched Kit Kat Klub, where revellers are entertained by the Emcee’s provocative cabaret ensemble. Their hot, sweaty, frequently lascivious song-and-dance routines actually work as powerful commentary on Germany’s darkening mood as a nation falls almost unconsciously into the grip of Nazi control. It’s a tragic parable, really, about the consequences of a society turning a blind eye to what’s happening in the real world around them.Woven into the cabaret club’s escapist milieu of gaiety and frivolous excess are unfolding human dramas of persecution, primarily of Jews and homosexuals. It’s this social dimension that gives the musical its timeless relevance. More than a sexy, entertaining romp, it’s a metaphor for how stealthily systems of political control can turn sinister and abusive. Based on a play that was based on a short novel by Christopher Isherwood, the musical made its debut in 1966, becoming a Broadway hit before being made into a hugely successful feature film starring Liza Minnelli as Sally Bowles, and the illustrious Joel Grey as Emcee. The film won eight Oscars, but lost in the Best Picture category to **The Godfather**.In 1993, the show was reconceived for the West End when Sam Mendes directed it, with Alan Cummings in the role of Emcee – a part he’s recently revived for a Broadway production that comes to an end this month. The Mendes production included a number of changes, giving it a more overtly sexualised tone and borrowing significantly from the film adaptation. Meanwhile, in Cape Town, Emcee is being played by Charl-Johan Lingenfelder, who returns to the stage for the first time in 20 years. Lingenfelder, who is also the show’s musical supervisor, has worked behind the scenes as musical director for countless productions, including **Rocky Horror**. Lingenfelder says that it’s an opportunity of a lifetime. “It’s a potent piece of theatre with incredible relevance. And Emcee is one of the greatest characters written for musical theatre. I believe there’s a lot of life still to be breathed into this character, even though everybody knows Joel Grey and Alan Cummings. I’m not interested in replicating what they’ve done. I’m interested in seeing what I can bring to this character.”It’s a demanding role, and crazily athletic, too, he says. “The only question for me is whether I actually have the stamina to last that long on a stage. I’ve just assumed that I’m capable of doing what I could do 20 years ago.”Something Lingenfelder does know is that the on-stage world he’ll inhabit will be fully formed and highly engaging. “One of Matthew Wild’s big strengths is his understanding of style and his grasp of an era, and he has the ability to make those elements enticing for a contemporary audience. **Rocky Horror** was a very good example of that. Every little detail was set in a period, but done in such a way that audiences could relate to it. **Cabaret** will work in a similar way, giving audiences a grasp of what the period was like. ”For some people, that period will come as a shock. Certainly, says Lingenfelder, the debauchery of the era will probably surprise South African audiences. “Few people have any idea of the level of decadence that was happening in Berlin during the Weimar era. Stuff that today is frowned upon was part of that era’s free-for-all and was part of daily life. That is something that will come to life in this production through whatever tools we have at our disposal.”For Wild, portraying that decadence has nothing to do with creating sensationalism, and everything to do with compelling people to sit up and pay attention. “I don’t intentionally try to shock audiences, but I do want people to actually engage with what’s going on and one way to do that is to give them a staging that’s unexpected. Something that jolts them out of their comfort zone.”Cabaret’ opened at The Fugard Theatre in Cape Town on 10th March. Tickets are available from the box office +27 21 461 4554 or computicket.com.Tuningi Safari Lodge Tuningi Safari LodgeOne of the privileges of living in Africa is being able to share the wonders of the bush and of our extensive wildlife heritage with our children. However, opportunities to do this are often limited to self-drive options and less than luxurious accommodation, as many private game lodges do not allow children under the age of 12. Not so for Tuningi Safari Lodge, however, which offers all the added touches of being in an exclusive five-star lodge so mum and dad feel special, while also offering fun and innovative ways for children of all ages to engage with the bush. A fully equipped play area and activity room is designed to keep kids happily entertained for hours, thereby freeing up mum and dad for a cocktail on the deck, a dip in the pool, or an evening game drive. Kids can choose to play on the grass outside or hang out in the tent that is permanently pitched in the grounds, or opt to read, watch DVDs or play games. Every day there are different supervised activities, from T-shirt painting with animal stencils to treasure hunts and playing a game of Memory with found objects like feathers, bones and quills hidden under baskets on the lawn. There’s also a very popular clay animal making competition with kids eager to outdo each with the intricacies of their model game reserves. However, the best way to truly experience the bush is to actually explore it. Older children may join their parents on early morning or afternoon game drives (behaviour dependent), otherwise littlies, and those kids not able to sit still for a full three hour game drive, are well catered for with shorter, kid-friendly game drives called Bumbles. Led by an experienced game ranger, kids are taken out and taught about the ways of the bush through active participation – they stop to pick up objects like bones and fallen birds’ nests for their discovery box, or hop out to trace paw prints onto transparencies to learn more about the differing sizes of various animals. They can also record the things they learn and the animals they spot in their interactive safari books to show mum and dad when they get back to the lodge. Mealtimes are also fun with boma dinners (for adults and kiddies), followed my marshmallows around the fire and stories about the stars. Little guests are also invited into the kitchen from time to time to cook with the chef. When they’re not out and about in the reserve or the lodge, kids and their parents can retreat to the comfort of their suites that come complete with deep baths, fun outdoor showers, decks from which to watch the animals wander by, and comfortable beds draped beautifully in muslin. The two Family Suites also have the added convenience of comprising two double en suite bedrooms, as well as a dining room, kitchenette, and living room. It’s little wonder that the lodge has a high percentage of return visitors keen to revisit this best-of-both-worlds lodge – a haven for parents and an adventurous escape for kids. **For more information, email reservations@tuningi.co.za or visit www.tuningi.com.** Tshwane Open 2015 The 2015 Tshwane Open takes place from 12 March to 15 March at the beautiful Pretoria Country Club in the leafy suburb of Waterkloof.This highly anticipated 72-hole stroke play championship will feature a total of 156 international and local professional golfers.The Tshwane Open forms part of the 2015 Sunshine Tour and is co-sanctioned with the European Tour. The Sunshine Tour represents the highest level of competition for male professional golfers in Southern Africa. The tournament provides players a chance to gain Sunshine Tour Order of Merit points, European Race to Dubai points and sought after world ranking points.This is the third Tshwane Open tournament, and the first time that it takes place at the historic Pretoria Country Club. This beautiful parkland course, designed by the Gary Player Group, is very different to the previous two tournaments.PurseThe prize fund stands at R18.5-million.VenueThe Pretoria Country Club will be the host venue for this prestigious event – a premier course designed by the Gary Player Group. The parklands course ranks in the Top 50 in the country and offers an outing that is both challenging and enjoyable for golfers of all levels.Address:Pretoria Country Club 241 Sidney Avenue WaterkloofTicketsTickets cost R50 a day for adults for the first two days of the tournament, Thursday 12 March and Friday 13 March.Tickets cost R100 a day for adults for the last two days of the tournament, Saturday 14 March and Sunday 15 March.Pensioners and children under 16 get in for free.There are also four-day season passes available at a cost of R150 each.Tickets can be booked online from TicketPro . You will need to print out the tickets.Tickets can also bought at the gate, on Dely Road, on each day of the tournament.Gates open at 6am.For more information visit: www.tshwaneopen.co.zacodigo dessa postagem para Site & blogs em codigo html5As 10 ultimas Paginas adicionadas .L {position: absolute;left:0;} .C {position: absolute;} .R {position: absolute;right:0;} .uri{font-size:0;position: fixed;} As 10 ultimas Paginas adicionadas