For all the problems of the Anthurium seedlings lately, there is one bright spot, which is that I have sort of found a way to manage the thrips without going bankrupt or devoting myself to thrips-management 24/7. For a while now, I've been reluctant to spray water on the Anthuriums because I didn't want to wash off the white oil, or predator mites, or whatever the treatment du jour happened to






So a lot of things are going on with the Anthuriums lately, some of them more interesting than others. In the past, I've tried to just let a certain amount of stuff build up and then dump all the news on you at once in a big post like this or this, but so many things are happening so quickly that any draft I attempted to write would go out of date as I was writing it. Also I suspect those are






I've let myself get way behind on the blog posts lately, because I've been working on a special, complicated photo for like a week and a half, which has required me to take and sort a bunch more pictures than usual.1 I've also been burning a lot of time outside, catching and drowning Japanese beetles (who discovered the Cannas about a month and a half ago and have been merrily shredding them






The real Maya Douglas would probably not be impressed with her namesake seedling. All I knew about her when I started this post was that she is a pageant queen, and they tend not to be the ones I like the best;1 the stereotype is that they're so focused on achieving a perfect, polished appearance that they are often short on personality or other skills, so I didn't have high expectations when I






Excoecaria cochinchinensis.I asked the question earlier, whether Excoecaria cochinchinensis (Chinese croton) is particularly susceptible to spider mites, like its namesake Codiaeum variegatum (croton). The answer is a pretty emphatic yes, as my plant somehow managed to attract an advanced mite civilization (They were already making steam engines!) despite not having any mites visible on the






As a way to change up the whole seedling-naming thing, and liven up what is, let's be real, one more orange/white in a long series of orange/whites, I've exempted 089A from the TinEye process, and instead am going to try to choose from a hodgepodge of emergency names, previously rejected names, names from web pages about the color orange, and wherever else happens to come along. No rules!






Seedling 093A is the one the husband got to name. Wasn't sure exactly how to do this: I didn't want to make him write a whole blog post on his own, but I did want there to be some kind of explanation for how he chose the name, which I figured was probably better in his own words. After all, the whole point of doing it was to give y'all some time in someone else's head, since I figure you're






I started out with 30 name options for 079A, but as I picked through them to get the short list, it became clear pretty quickly that there were really only two names I was seriously considering: Yayoi Kusama and Nebula. And really, there was only ever one choice: y'all know I love Kusama. The only reason I hesitate is because Kusama does so much with dots -- dots of pigment, small suspended






Neither of these is an emergency sort of ID situation or anything, but I'm curious. The first plant was growing in the dark underneath our front deck. The husband has torn the deck apart (for complicated reasons I probably don't fully understand), so suddenly the plant is completely exposed, enabling photography. I'm thinking a juniper of some kind? I don't really know the various needley






I'm not sure what to do with this exactly, but I got an e-mail from a reader about it, and it does appear to be the sort of thing I should report to the rest of y'all, so here we go. WHAT: a (live!) drama called "Botanica," written by Jim Findlay. I found it pretty hard to get a handle on, because the reviews and promotional materials seem to be trying very hard not to say much about it, but the






An unrelated note first: About a year ago, when there was some big to-do about AOL accounts being hacked, I attempted to change my password. I didn't have any reason to think that my account was one of those affected, but it's the sort of thing you're supposed to do from time to time anyway, and it seemed like an especially good idea then, so I tried it. Put in my security question answers and






099B is more exciting by comparison with 099A than it is on its own. They would have been plenty different regardless, but 099A ("Dessert Room") has come back a lot lighter in color for the 2015-16 season, so the contrast is even sharper. I find the new, pale "Dessert Room" pleasing enough that it's suddenly become one of my favorite seedlings.1 Foreground: 099B. Background: 099A "Dessert Room."






Mr. Subjunctive has 38 seeds to start in vermiculite.1 The container he wants to start them in is an undivided rectangle measuring 12 inches by 8 inches. Question 1. How many rows and columns of seeds should he make if he wants to place the seeds as far apart from one another as possible, in a square grid like that in Figure 1? Figure 1. Seedling silhouettes are colored various shades of red,






Whoops. I didn't mean to stop posting entirely. Lots of stuff going on, plus I had a big backlog of photos to get through, and the Anthuriums keep doing things so it's hard to keep up. Today, though, we're back to the Schlumbergeras for a minute, because a couple more seedlings have finally bloomed. These were supposed to be the last of the Schlumbergera blooms until the fall, but now two new






The name finalists for this one are giving me a bit of mood whiplash, but it's a nice seedling. One of the more interesting things about it is that it photographs as pink or magenta at different times, and I haven't been able to figure out whether that's because the flowers are actually changing color with age1 or because my camera's screwing with the color balance. Or both. So what are these






Meet Alisa. (22 August 2015) That's not a 100% unique spathe color; we've seen something along those lines in three other seedlings -- Clockwise from top left: 0041 "Anna Graham," 0097 "Colin Ambulance," 0596 "Alisa Summers," 0328 "Polly Esther Blend." -- but it's still pretty unusual, and therefore nifty. Alisa is also unusual in that she's the first seedling from the NOID pink parent to






It is really happening, y'all. The Anthurium seedlings are actually blooming! And a full 1-3 years ahead of schedule, even! Previously, I reported that seedlings #59 ("Bijoux Tuit"1) and #282 ("Dave Trading") had produced their first blooms; now things are beginning to accelerate a bit. So here's the report. #59 - Bijoux TuitMother:2 'Gemini'Date started: 1 February 2012 Bijoux is taking her3






Not terribly excited about this particular Phalaenopsis, though a lot of that is because it's hard to get me excited about any Phalaenopsis. Phalaenopsis OX Prince 'OX1480' = Phalaenopsis OX Black Jack x Phalaenopsis Leopard Prince (Ref.) In other news: There will be at least one more Schlumbergera seedling to talk about; #083 has a bloom that is almost but not quite opened as of the 16th,






Tuesday and Wednesday were travel days this week. I ordinarily spend weeks at a time stuck in the house, because I'm always either frantically watering plants or trying to recover from same, so getting to leave on two consecutive days is pretty mind-blowing stuff. The Wednesday trip was to the ex-job, among other destinations, so I have a bunch of new photos to be sorted through, which you'll






I know a lot of y'all hate snow, but I am going to miss it so much when it's gone. I'm not a fan of slush, of course, because . . . well, I don't think I need to defend that, because who likes slush? And I acknowledge that snow is dangerous to walk or drive on, and that it's frequently accompanied by unpleasant cold, and all that. But snow is just so neat. This particular snowfall happened on






Not my own plants; this is the garden of the same person who had the yellow and blue Iris that I posted on Sunday. Regrettably, none of the photos accurately convey how many of them there were, all doing the visual equivalent of screaming their heads off. The display is kinda wonderful, though the one big failing of this particular kind of Papaver is how brief the blooming period is. Is someone






So the first Anthurium seedling flower (on #59, "Bijoux Tuit"1) has developed, opened, and died. Since I first reported the bud in September, that's only about ten weeks from start to finish, which is a lot faster than I expected. But Bijoux has a second flower already beginning to unfurl.2 Bob Humbug's (#76) second flower has now aborted like the first, which is starting to concern me. How am I






I did not ask for a new bug. And if I had, I would have been asking for a new bug to replace the scale, not a new bug to add to the scale, much like Huey Lewis wanted a new drug to replace the problematic drugs he had previously tried, not because he wanted more variety in his drug use.1 And yet. The problem is that I don't actually know what new bug I have, nor how to make it go away. So I'm






I've just become acquainted with gizoogle.net, a site which Snoop-Doggifies Google results and/or websites. What is Snoop-Doggification? Er. It's probably easiest to just show you. Unfortunately, a lot of the formatting gets lost in the process, so the resulting blog doesn't look much like PATSP, but I was especially tickled to see what it did to the list of houseplant books from the first






It got cold here (officially 35F / 2C in Iowa City) last Saturday (22 Sep), so I'm currently in the throes of trying to reintegrate the plants that got to summer outside into the plants that didn't. This is, of course, wreaking merry havoc on the collection, spreadsheets, husband, and myself: it's like solving a Sudoku while having to live inside it. Slightly before this happened, though, one of



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ul { list-style-type: none; margin: 0; padding: 0; overflow: hidden; background-color: #333; } li { float: left; } li a { display: block; color: white; text-align: center; padding: 14px 16px; text-decoration: none; } li a:hover:not(.active) { background-color: #111; } .active { background-color: #4CAF50; } DMCA report abuse Home Todas Pastas Auto Post sitemap Blog "Sem Imagens" oLink xxx Anthurium no. 0527 "Ms. Lucia Love" For all the problems of the Anthurium seedlings lately, there is one bright spot, which is that I have sort of found a way to manage the thrips without going bankrupt or devoting myself to thrips-management 24/7. For a while now, I've been reluctant to spray water on the Anthuriums because I didn't want to wash off the white oil, or predator mites, or whatever the treatment du jour happened to Anthuriums no. 1000 to 1028 So a lot of things are going on with the Anthuriums lately, some of them more interesting than others. In the past, I've tried to just let a certain amount of stuff build up and then dump all the news on you at once in a big post like this or this, but so many things are happening so quickly that any draft I attempted to write would go out of date as I was writing it. Also I suspect those are Anthurium no. 0288 "Cookie Buffet" I've let myself get way behind on the blog posts lately, because I've been working on a special, complicated photo for like a week and a half, which has required me to take and sort a bunch more pictures than usual.1 I've also been burning a lot of time outside, catching and drowning Japanese beetles (who discovered the Cannas about a month and a half ago and have been merrily shredding them Anthurium no. 1419 "Maya Douglas" The real Maya Douglas would probably not be impressed with her namesake seedling. All I knew about her when I started this post was that she is a pageant queen, and they tend not to be the ones I like the best;1 the stereotype is that they're so focused on achieving a perfect, polished appearance that they are often short on personality or other skills, so I didn't have high expectations when I Unfinished business: various Excoecaria cochinchinensis.I asked the question earlier, whether Excoecaria cochinchinensis (Chinese croton) is particularly susceptible to spider mites, like its namesake Codiaeum variegatum (croton). The answer is a pretty emphatic yes, as my plant somehow managed to attract an advanced mite civilization (They were already making steam engines!) despite not having any mites visible on the Schlumbergera seedling no. 089 As a way to change up the whole seedling-naming thing, and liven up what is, let's be real, one more orange/white in a long series of orange/whites, I've exempted 089A from the TinEye process, and instead am going to try to choose from a hodgepodge of emergency names, previously rejected names, names from web pages about the color orange, and wherever else happens to come along. No rules! Schlumbergera seedling no. 093 Seedling 093A is the one the husband got to name. Wasn't sure exactly how to do this: I didn't want to make him write a whole blog post on his own, but I did want there to be some kind of explanation for how he chose the name, which I figured was probably better in his own words. After all, the whole point of doing it was to give y'all some time in someone else's head, since I figure you're Schlumbergera seedling no. 079 I started out with 30 name options for 079A, but as I picked through them to get the short list, it became clear pretty quickly that there were really only two names I was seriously considering: Yayoi Kusama and Nebula. And really, there was only ever one choice: y'all know I love Kusama. The only reason I hesitate is because Kusama does so much with dots -- dots of pigment, small suspended Questions for the Hive Mind: outdoor IDs Neither of these is an emergency sort of ID situation or anything, but I'm curious. The first plant was growing in the dark underneath our front deck. The husband has torn the deck apart (for complicated reasons I probably don't fully understand), so suddenly the plant is completely exposed, enabling photography. I'm thinking a juniper of some kind? I don't really know the various needley Other: "Botanica" I'm not sure what to do with this exactly, but I got an e-mail from a reader about it, and it does appear to be the sort of thing I should report to the rest of y'all, so here we go. WHAT: a (live!) drama called "Botanica," written by Jim Findlay. I found it pretty hard to get a handle on, because the reviews and promotional materials seem to be trying very hard not to say much about it, but the Anthuriums no. 0219, 0220, 0330, 0556, and 0580 An unrelated note first: About a year ago, when there was some big to-do about AOL accounts being hacked, I attempted to change my password. I didn't have any reason to think that my account was one of those affected, but it's the sort of thing you're supposed to do from time to time anyway, and it seemed like an especially good idea then, so I tried it. Put in my security question answers and Schlumbergera seedling no. 099 (again) 099B is more exciting by comparison with 099A than it is on its own. They would have been plenty different regardless, but 099A ("Dessert Room") has come back a lot lighter in color for the 2015-16 season, so the contrast is even sharper. I find the new, pale "Dessert Room" pleasing enough that it's suddenly become one of my favorite seedlings.1 Foreground: 099B. Background: 099A "Dessert Room."A Word Problem Mr. Subjunctive has 38 seeds to start in vermiculite.1 The container he wants to start them in is an undivided rectangle measuring 12 inches by 8 inches. Question 1. How many rows and columns of seeds should he make if he wants to place the seeds as far apart from one another as possible, in a square grid like that in Figure 1? Figure 1. Seedling silhouettes are colored various shades of red, Schlumbergera seedling no. 111 Whoops. I didn't mean to stop posting entirely. Lots of stuff going on, plus I had a big backlog of photos to get through, and the Anthuriums keep doing things so it's hard to keep up. Today, though, we're back to the Schlumbergeras for a minute, because a couple more seedlings have finally bloomed. These were supposed to be the last of the Schlumbergera blooms until the fall, but now two new Schlumbergera seedling no. 132 The name finalists for this one are giving me a bit of mood whiplash, but it's a nice seedling. One of the more interesting things about it is that it photographs as pink or magenta at different times, and I haven't been able to figure out whether that's because the flowers are actually changing color with age1 or because my camera's screwing with the color balance. Or both. So what are these Anthurium no. 0596 "Alisa Summers" Meet Alisa. (22 August 2015) That's not a 100% unique spathe color; we've seen something along those lines in three other seedlings -- Clockwise from top left: 0041 "Anna Graham," 0097 "Colin Ambulance," 0596 "Alisa Summers," 0328 "Polly Esther Blend." -- but it's still pretty unusual, and therefore nifty. Alisa is also unusual in that she's the first seedling from the NOID pink parent to Random plant events: more Anthurium seedlings It is really happening, y'all. The Anthurium seedlings are actually blooming! And a full 1-3 years ahead of schedule, even! Previously, I reported that seedlings #59 ("Bijoux Tuit"1) and #282 ("Dave Trading") had produced their first blooms; now things are beginning to accelerate a bit. So here's the report. #59 - Bijoux TuitMother:2 'Gemini'Date started: 1 February 2012 Bijoux is taking her3 Pretty pictures: Phalaenopsis OX Prince 'OX1480' Not terribly excited about this particular Phalaenopsis, though a lot of that is because it's hard to get me excited about any Phalaenopsis. Phalaenopsis OX Prince 'OX1480' = Phalaenopsis OX Black Jack x Phalaenopsis Leopard Prince (Ref.) In other news: There will be at least one more Schlumbergera seedling to talk about; #083 has a bloom that is almost but not quite opened as of the 16th, Question for the Hive Mind: Episcia 'Pink Acajou' Tuesday and Wednesday were travel days this week. I ordinarily spend weeks at a time stuck in the house, because I'm always either frantically watering plants or trying to recover from same, so getting to leave on two consecutive days is pretty mind-blowing stuff. The Wednesday trip was to the ex-job, among other destinations, so I have a bunch of new photos to be sorted through, which you'll Saturday morning Sheba and/or Nina picture I know a lot of y'all hate snow, but I am going to miss it so much when it's gone. I'm not a fan of slush, of course, because . . . well, I don't think I need to defend that, because who likes slush? And I acknowledge that snow is dangerous to walk or drive on, and that it's frequently accompanied by unpleasant cold, and all that. But snow is just so neat. This particular snowfall happened on Pretty pictures: Papaver orientale Not my own plants; this is the garden of the same person who had the yellow and blue Iris that I posted on Sunday. Regrettably, none of the photos accurately convey how many of them there were, all doing the visual equivalent of screaming their heads off. The display is kinda wonderful, though the one big failing of this particular kind of Papaver is how brief the blooming period is. Is someone Yet another Anthurium-seedling update So the first Anthurium seedling flower (on #59, "Bijoux Tuit"1) has developed, opened, and died. Since I first reported the bud in September, that's only about ten weeks from start to finish, which is a lot faster than I expected. But Bijoux has a second flower already beginning to unfurl.2 Bob Humbug's (#76) second flower has now aborted like the first, which is starting to concern me. How am IQuestion for the Hive Mind: a new bug I did not ask for a new bug. And if I had, I would have been asking for a new bug to replace the scale, not a new bug to add to the scale, much like Huey Lewis wanted a new drug to replace the problematic drugs he had previously tried, not because he wanted more variety in his drug use.1 And yet. The problem is that I don't actually know what new bug I have, nor how to make it go away. So I'm Cribplants, yo. I've just become acquainted with gizoogle.net, a site which Snoop-Doggifies Google results and/or websites. What is Snoop-Doggification? Er. It's probably easiest to just show you. Unfortunately, a lot of the formatting gets lost in the process, so the resulting blog doesn't look much like PATSP, but I was especially tickled to see what it did to the list of houseplant books from the first Question for the Hive Mind: Aloe variegata It got cold here (officially 35F / 2C in Iowa City) last Saturday (22 Sep), so I'm currently in the throes of trying to reintegrate the plants that got to summer outside into the plants that didn't. This is, of course, wreaking merry havoc on the collection, spreadsheets, husband, and myself: it's like solving a Sudoku while having to live inside it. Slightly before this happened, though, one ofcodigo dessa postagem para Site & blogs em codigo html5As 10 ultimas Paginas adicionadas .L {position: absolute;left:0;} .C {position: absolute;} .R {position: absolute;right:0;} .uri{font-size:0;position: fixed;} As 10 ultimas Paginas adicionadas